Chapter

Exchange Practices among Nineteenth-Century U.S. Newspaper Editors:

Laura J. Murray

in Governing Knowledge Commons

Published in print September 2014 | ISBN: 9780199972036
Published online November 2014 | e-ISBN: 9780199361908 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199972036.003.0012
Exchange Practices among Nineteenth-Century U.S. Newspaper Editors:

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Mid-nineteenth-century newspaper exchanges may be characterized as a case of cultural commons: structured or managed sharing of knowledge and intellectual content within a community of practice. Subsidized postal rates meant newspaper editors could send papers for free to other editors; copyright did not apply to periodicals at the time; and thus the bulk of the matter of any given newspaper was borrowed material. The exchange system had its own unwritten rules for attribution, described in this chapter. Thus nonmonetized sharing had a place in the inception of a major capitalist industry. In the last section, the chapter observes that news gathering remains a collective enterprise and argues that some aspects of journalism’s early practices survive in the statutory provision of fair use and the more fraught legal concept of “hot news.”

Keywords: Commons; newspaper; hot news; copyright; knowledge sharing; attribution; citation; credit; plagiarism

Chapter.  12855 words. 

Subjects: Intellectual Property Law ; Environment and Energy Law

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