Journal Article

Pressure recording analytical method (PRAM) for measurement of cardiac output during various haemodynamic states

S. Scolletta, S. M. Romano, B. Biagioli, G. Capannini and P. Giomarelli

in BJA: British Journal of Anaesthesia

Published on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia

Volume 95, issue 2, pages 159-165
Published in print August 2005 | ISSN: 0007-0912
Published online May 2005 | e-ISSN: 1471-6771 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bja/aei154
Pressure recording analytical method (PRAM) for measurement of cardiac output during various haemodynamic states

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Background. Cardiac output (CO) can be measured using the pressure recording analytical method (PRAM), which is a new, less invasive technique allowing beat-by-beat stroke volume monitoring from the pressure signals recorded in femoral or radial arteries.

Methods. We investigated PRAM by comparing its cardiac output (PRAM-CO) with paired measurements obtained by electromagnetic flowmetry (EM-CO) and by standard thermodilution (ThD-CO) during various haemodynamic states in a swine model. Nine pigs were monitored with a pulmonary artery catheter and a femoral artery catheter at baseline, in a hyperdynamic state produced by administration of dobutamine and in a hypodynamic state induced by progressive exsanguination. Bland–Altman analysis was used.

Results. One hundred and eight paired cardiac output values over a range of EM-CO of 1.8–10.4 litre min−1 resulted. We found close agreement between the techniques. Mean bias between EM-CO and PRAM-CO was −0.03 litre min−1 (precision 0.58 litre min−1). The 95% limits of agreement were −0.61 to +0.55 litre min−1. Similar results between ThD-CO and PRAM-CO were found.

Conclusions. In a porcine model we have demonstrated accuracy of PRAM during various haemodynamic states. PRAM is a reliable tool to detect changes in cardiac output in pigs and has ability as a basic research tool.

Keywords: heart, cardiac output; measurement techniques, cardiac output; measurement techniques, pulse contour method; measurement techniques, thermodilution; model, pig

Journal Article.  4243 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Anaesthetics

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