Journal Article

17.1 A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF CANNABIDIOL IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

Philip McGuire, Philip Robson, Wiesław Cubała, Daniel Vasile, Paul Morrison, Rachel Barron, Adam Taylor and Stephen Wright

in Schizophrenia Bulletin

Volume 44, issue suppl_1, pages S27-S27
Published in print April 2018 | ISSN: 0586-7614
Published online April 2018 | e-ISSN: 1745-1701 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sby014.065
17.1 A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF CANNABIDIOL IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

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Abstract

Background

Both preclinical and human research suggest that cannabidiol (CBD) has antipsychotic properties. This study assessed the safety and effectiveness of CBD in patients with schizophrenia.

Methods

Patients with schizophrenia (n=88) were randomized to receive CBD (1000 mg/day) or placebo alongside their existing antipsychotic medication for 6 weeks. Participants were assessed before and after treatment using the PANSS, BACS, GAF scales, and the CGI Improvement and Severity scales.

Results

Compared those given placebo, patients treated with CBD had lower levels of positive psychotic symptoms (PANSS; p=0.02), and were more likely to have been rated by clinicians as improved (CGI-I; p=0.02) and as not severely unwell (CGI-S; p=0.04). Patients who received CBD also showed trends for greater improvements in cognitive performance (BACS; p=0.07) and in overall functioning (GAF; p=0.08). There was no difference in the frequency of CBD of adverse events between CBD and placebo.

Discussion

These data suggest that CBD has beneficial effects in patients with schizophrenia and is not associated with significant adverse effects.

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Subjects: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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