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A

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 53 words.

Symbol of emptiness (śūnyatā) and of the undifferentiated source of appearance in Zen Buddhism. In Japanese esoteric

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<i>A</i>

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 28 words.

(Gk., alpha).

First letter of the Greek alphabet, combined with the last, Ω (omega), to refer to God as the

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A

John Bowker.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religious Studies. 13 words.

Letter of negation in several languages, as in, e.g., atheism, adharma.

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A “Do-Nothing” Organization? The Catholic Association, 1934–1974

Nicholas M. Creary.

in Domesticating a Religious Import

April 2011; p ublished online January 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Religion. 17520 words.

The Catholic Association (CA) was the first organized lay movement in the Catholic Church in colonial Zimbabwe. While African laymen founded the organization, Jesuit and clerical...

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A “Heretic,” a “Maverick,” and the Challenge to Inclusivity

Michael R. Cohen.

in The Birth of Conservative Judaism

May 2012; p ublished online November 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Judaism and Jewish Studies. 6669 words.

From 1913–1918, the United Synagogue of America remained staunchly committed to diversity. Its members overlooked their vast differences, choosing instead to work together to implement...

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A “Heroick and Masculine-Spirited Championess”: Deborah in Early Modern Gender Debates

Joy A. Schroeder.

in Deborah's Daughters

March 2014; p ublished online April 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Biblical Studies. 15643 words.

In the Early Modern period (1600–1800), there was a virtual explosion of female-authored publications. Women scholars, poets, and public speakers argued that they were following the example...

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A “national Church” and Its Holy Scriptures

Jeffrey F. Meyer.

in Myths in Stone

February 2001; p ublished online May 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Religious Studies. 10022 words.

This chapter addresses the sacralization process of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. It also explores the fate of Pierre Charles L'Enfant's plan to develop an important...

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A “New Politics” Candidate

Raymond A. Schroth and S. J..

in Bob Drinan

November 2010; p ublished online March 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Religious Studies. 7537 words.

Drinan's interests and areas of expertise were broadening, to the point where, although he had zero political experience and had never even registered as a member of a political party, he...

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A “Pre-History” of Papal Embargo

Stefan K. Stantchev.

in Spiritual Rationality

July 2014; p ublished online August 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Religion; Social and Cultural History. 14052 words.

Following a broadly conceived introduction, Chapter 1 presents the specific problem of papal embargo and positions the reader in time, place, and historical contexts. Late medieval ‘crusade...

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A ‘Book of Starres’ or ‘A Starred Text’? George Herbert Meets Roland Barthes

Andy Sutton-Jones.

in Literature and Theology

September 2006; p ublished online June 2006 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Literature; Religion and Art, Literature, and Music. 6379 words.

A ‘book of starres’ or a ‘starred text’? This article examines the surprising parallels between the astrological depictions of Herbert's Bible and Barthes’ text. Reading for both is likened...

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