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Social Sciences x Social Movements and Social Change x clear all

Multiculturalism

Ali Rattansi.

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Book. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 200 pages.

Multiculturalism: A Very Short Introduction believes that multiculturalism is in terminal crisis. It has been blamed for undermining national identity, diluting social cohesion, creating...

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What is multiculturalism?

in Multiculturalism

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 9815 words.

An acceptable definition of multiculturalism is notoriously elusive. ‘Multiculturalism’ entered public discourses in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It has never been about encouraging...

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Is multiculturalism bad for women?

Ali Rattansi.

in Multiculturalism

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 7438 words.

Suggesting that multiculturalism might be bad for women may seem odd given that multiculturalism originated around the same time as feminism. In fact there is no reason why claims for...

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Has multiculturalism created ghettos and ‘parallel lives’?

Ali Rattansi.

in Multiculturalism

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 7377 words.

The racial riots of 2001 and after that afflicted northern areas in Britain were extremely damaging for multiculturalism in Britain and the rest of Europe. The government reports into the...

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‘Integration’, class inequality, and ‘community cohesion’

Ali Rattansi.

in Multiculturalism

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 7170 words.

The concept of ‘integration’ has replaced multiculturalism as the key theme of national and local policies towards ethnic minorities. Especially in Britain, the notions of ‘community...

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National identity, belonging, and the ‘Muslim question’

in Multiculturalism

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 7290 words.

If we acknowledge that ‘integration’ is replacing multiculturalism in Europe we need to ask: integration into what? Or in terms of ‘community cohesion’, cohesion based on what? What does...

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Conclusion: Moving on: multiculturalism, interculturalism, and transnationalism in a new global era

in Multiculturalism

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 6268 words.

The first question to ask is: has multiculturalism failed? Many European national states have decided that multiculturalism is over. This VSI argues that the opposite is true....

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Introduction

Ali Rattansi.

in Multiculturalism

September 2011; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 1682 words.

Multiculturalists can sometimes have a simplistic view of ethnic cultures as homogenous entities, having core, essential characteristics. The reality is much more complicated....

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Soybeans and Power

Pablo Lapegna.

October 2016; p ublished online September 2016 .

Book. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 248 pages.

Genetically modified (GM) or transgenic crops transformed global agriculture since their commercial release in the mid-1990s. GM crops are the product of genetically engineered seeds that...

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Algeria Modern

Edited by Luis Martinez and Rasmus Alenius Boserup.

May 2016; p ublished online September 2016 .

Book. Subjects: Social Movements and Social Change. 256 pages.

For decades, Algeria has been depicted as an inaccessible, opaque, rentier state and under the control of secret intelligence agencies and inaccessible “cartels” and “clans”. While that...

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