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Arts and Humanities x Literary Studies (European) x Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers) x clear all

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‘And don’t dispute with fools’

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 5585 words.

‘“And don't dispute with fools”: Men, women, and society’ references Pushkin's view of the poet as conflicted by having to live both in the world of mysticism, art, and religion, as well as...

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‘Awakening noble feelings with my lyre’

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 6620 words.

‘“Awakening noble feelings with my lyre”: Writers as “masters of minds”’ examines, via examples of Pushkin's work, his views on the expectations of readers and their perceptions of the...

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‘Every tribe and every tongue will name me’

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 5762 words.

‘“Every tribe and every tongue will name me”: Russian literature and “primitive culture”‘ looks at Pushkin's fame and influence throughout the Soviet Union and beyond. Contemporary,...

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‘I have raised myself a monument’

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 3901 words.

‘“I have raised myself a monument”: Writer memorials and cults’ looks at how the Russian state memorialized writers and elevated them within society and culture. Pushkin is examined as a...

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‘I shall be famous as long as another poet lives’

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 4703 words.

Pushkin boasted that he would be famous forever, and other writers, and ordinary Russians, seem to agree. ‘“I shall be famous as long as another poet lives”: Writers' responses to Pushkin’...

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‘O Muse, be obedient to the command of God’

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 4728 words.

‘“O Muse, be obedient to the command of God”: The spiritual and material worlds’ looks at Pushkin's early rejection of references to religion in his work, his generation's distrust of overt...

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Russian Literature

Catriona Kelly.

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Book. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 182 pages.

Russian Literature: A Very Short Introduction explores the place and importance of literature in Russian culture. How and when did a Russian national literature come into being? What shaped...

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Testament

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 4090 words.

‘Testament’ establishes Pushkin as a giant of Russian literature. What did Pushkin actually write? What works is he best known for? What was the relationship of Russian writers to European...

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‘Tidings of me will go out over all great Rus’

Catriona Kelly.

in Russian Literature

August 2001; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers); Literary Studies (European); Literary Theory and Cultural Studies. 7565 words.

Pushkin set out to create a monument out of his work and ‘“Tidings of me will go out over all great Rus”: Pushkin and the Russian literary canon’ looks at the work that other writers left....

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