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Ambiguity And Vagueness In Legal Interpretation

Ralf Poscher.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Pragmatics. 8833 words.

Few topics in the theory of language are as closely related to legal interpretation as the linguistic indeterminacy associated with ambiguity and vagueness. Significant portions of the...

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Author Identification In The Forensic Setting

Carole E. Chaski.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics. 6054 words.

Author identification can play a role in the investigation of many different types of crimes, civil transactions, and security issues. Over the last fifteen years, author identification has...

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Bilingual Interpretation Rules As A Component Of Language Rights In Canada

Michel Bastarache.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Translation and Interpretation. 7637 words.

In Canada, a few groups enjoy explicit constitutional recognition, including certain official language minorities and aboriginals. In light of the constitutional history of Canada, the...

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The Caution in England and Wales

Frances Rock.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Sociolinguistics. 6381 words.

‘You do not have to say anything. But it may harm your defense if you do not mention when questioned something which you later rely on in Court. Anything you do say may be given in...

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Challenges To The Legal Translator

Susan Šarčević.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Translation and Interpretation. 5824 words.

Focusing on the link between law, language, and culture, J. B. White notes that legal translation is a ‘necessarily imperfect process’. This article focuses on challenges to legal...

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Constitutional Interpretation

Robert W. Bennett.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Translation and Interpretation. 6535 words.

Contemporary debates about constitutional interpretation in the United States seem fixated on what is called ‘originalism’, the view that, regardless of when some constitutional issue...

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Contract Formation as a Speech Act

Sanford Schane.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Pragmatics. 6982 words.

According to conventional contract law, the formation of a valid agreement ordinarily involves an offer, an acceptance, and consideration. The former two elements typically take place...

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Corpus Linguistics In Authorship Identification

Krzysztof Kredens and Malcolm Coulthard.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics. 5822 words.

Corpus linguistics is basically ‘an empirical approach to studying language, which uses observations of attested data in order to make generalisations about lexis, grammar, and semantics’,...

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Courtroom Discourse in China

Meizhen Liao.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Language Families. 5483 words.

This article examines courtroom discourse in China in terms of its three components: the contextual, the interactional, and the propositional. After briefly introducing the Chinese legal...

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Courtroom Discourse in Japan's New Judicial Order

Mami Hiraike Okawara.

in The Oxford Handbook of Language and Law

March 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Linguistics; Forensic Linguistics; Language Families. 5898 words.

The implementation of the saiban-in (lay judge) system in 2009 has opened the way, not only to lay participation, but also to some participation by linguists in Japanese courtrooms. This...

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