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Arts and Humanities x Music Theory and Analysis x clear all

“A Demonic Haydn”

Seth Monahan.

in Mahler's Symphonic Sonatas

May 2015; p ublished online April 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 18927 words.

This chapter begins by considering the possible synergies and frictions among the Sixth Symphony’s dominant reception tropes—those of tragedy, autobiography, and (neo)classicism. It then...

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“A Play within a Play”

Seth Monahan.

in Mahler's Symphonic Sonatas

May 2015; p ublished online April 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 14695 words.

This chapter focuses on Mahler’s explicitly “classicist” sonata, the opening of the Fourth Symphony. After demonstrating the many parallels of design between this movement and the opening...

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 A Singing Tone

Kenneth Hamilton.

in After the Golden Age

December 2007; p ublished online May 2008 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 12701 words.

This chapter analyses the Romantic obsession with a cantabile “singing tone” on the piano, with particular reference to techniques of pedaling, arpeggiation, and asynchronization of hands....

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 A Suitable Prelude

Kenneth Hamilton.

in After the Golden Age

December 2007; p ublished online May 2008 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 10300 words.

This chapter examines the virtually universal custom before the mid-decades of the 20th-century of pianists improvising preludes and transitions between pieces, with especial attention to...

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. A Way into Schoenberg’s Opus 15, Number VII

David Lewin.

in Studies in Music with Text

January 2006; p ublished online October 2011 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 11101 words.

Arnold Schoenberg's poem, Opus 15, Number VII, is an exploration of an affective disorder and comes in two parts. The first three lines expose the affects involved: Angst and Hoffen...

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About <i>Changes: Sixty-Four Studies for Six Harps</i>

James Tenney.

Edited by Larry Polansky, Lauren Pratt, Robert Wannamaker and Michael Winter.

in From Scratch

September 2015; p ublished online April 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 6327 words.

In his 1987 essay Changes: Sixty-Four Studies for Six Harps, James Tenney explains his intentions in this work with respect to harmony. First, he wanted to investigate the new harmonic...

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About <i>Diapason</i>

James Tenney.

Edited by Larry Polansky, Lauren Pratt, Robert Wannamaker and Michael Winter.

in From Scratch

September 2015; p ublished online April 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 1020 words.

James Tenney reflects on his 1996 composition Diapason. Near the beginning and the end of the piece, the “diapason” includes harmonics from the forty-eighth through sixty-fourth, whereas at...

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The Absence of the Work

Frédéric Pouillaude.

in Unworking Choreography

April 2017; p ublished online June 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Dance; Music Theory and Analysis. 5213 words.

This chapter explores the process of absenting in more radical terms that previously discussed in this book. More specifically, it attempts to move from absenting as a mere tendency of...

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<i>Absolute Music: The History of an Idea</i>. By Mark Evan Bonds. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2014, xvi + 375 pp

Thomas Grey.

in Music Theory Spectrum

June 2016; p ublished online May 2016 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis; Musicology and Music History. 5098 words.

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Acousmatic Fabrications

Brian Kane.

in Sound Unseen

July 2014; p ublished online June 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Music Theory and Analysis. 6762 words.

The career of the guitarist Les Paul provides a case study for the theory of acousmatic sound developed in chapters 4 and 5. Paul, like a magician, played with listeners of his radio...

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