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Classical Architecture

Donald M. Bailey.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt

June 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Archaeology; Archaeology of the Near East; Egyptian Archaeology; History of Art. 7224 words.

This article looks at the evidence for classical architecture in stone in the urban centres of Middle Egypt, including one new Greek city and three metropoleis. These are Antinoopolis, the...

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Egyptian Temples

Martina Minas‐Nerpel.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt

June 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Archaeology; Archaeology of the Near East; Egyptian Archaeology; History of Art. 9128 words.

This article focuses on architecture, decoration, and certain questions of cult topography. In a rather smooth transition from the Ptolemaic to the Roman period, Egyptian temples continued...

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Nilotica and the Image of Egypt

Molly Swetnam‐Burland.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt

June 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Archaeology; Archaeology of the Near East; Egyptian Archaeology; History of Art. 6584 words.

This article surveys Roman art known as 'nilotica' — artistic representations of Egypt and its residents. Though the word is ancient, the underlying concept is best understood as a...

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Portraits

Barbara E. Borg.

in The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt

June 2012; p ublished online November 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Archaeology; Archaeology of the Near East; Egyptian Archaeology; History of Art. 7511 words.

This article considers changes in Egyptian use of portraiture, which occurred around the same time as the establishment of Roman dominion. The most obvious change is a sudden increase in...

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Visibility, Privacy, and Missing Windows

Mary Shepperson.

in The Oxford Handbook of Light in Archaeology

P ublished online October 2017 .

Article. Subjects: Archaeology of the Near East; History of Art. 7468 words.

This chapter examines the means by which light was admitted to Mesopotamian domestic space, arguing that doorways were the primary light source for most rooms. The consequences of this are...

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