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amplification

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology — Literature.

Enlargement: expressing an idea more expansively, or increasing the amplitude of a sound. In analytical psychology, interpretation (2) of a dream-image through directed association and...

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anacoluthon

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology — Literature.

(Greek, ‘wanting sequence’),

a sentence in which a fresh construction is adopted before the former is complete.

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aphanisis

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology — Literary Theory and Cultural Studies.

A term used in psychoanalysis to denote the disappearance of sexual desire. It was coined in 1927 by the Welsh psychoanalyst Ernest Jones (1879–1958) in his Papers on Psycho-Analysis (5th...

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aphorism

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — Psychology.

A succinct, pithy adage or maxim expressing a universal truth, such as Procrastination is the thief of time or, more pointedly, Punctuality is the thief of time. [From Greek aphorizein to...

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apostrophe

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — Psychology.

(from Greek, ‘to turn away’),

a figure of speech in which the writer rhetorically addresses a dead or absent person or abstraction.

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asyndeton

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — Psychology.

A form of sentence construction in which a conjunction is omitted for economy of expression or rhetorical effect. A double asyndeton occurs in the usual English translation of Julius...

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catachresis

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — Psychology.

Any misuse or wrong application of a word, often by assuming its meaning to be that of a word with a similar sound, as in the utterance I suffer from prostrate trouble, seeming to imply...

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eye rhyme

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — Psychology.

Words that have similar endings in their written form but are pronounced differently, such as love and move.

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Franz Joseph Gall

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — Psychology.

(1758–1828).

German anatomist and founder of phrenology, who was born in Baden and settled in Vienna (1785) as a physician. He was an anatomist of some distinction and the man ...

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grapheme

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology — Literature.

Any individual character in written language; in alphabetic languages, a letter or other alphanumeric character. The smallest unit in written language. Compare phoneme; see alsonull...

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