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digitization

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Bibliography.

n. (in radiology) the conversion of an analogue image to a digital image. The image is broken down to pixels and numerical values assigned to each pixel for its position and to...

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gallimaufry

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography — Medicine and Health.

The term ‘gallimaufry’, which in the sixteenth century was a dish comprising a hodge-podge of miscellaneous scraps of food, generally denotes a heterogeneous, random, unsystematic...

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margin

Overview page. Subjects: Dentistry — Bibliography.

An edge or border. The alveolar margin forms the peripheral edge of bone around the tooth socket. The cavity margin is where the prepared surface of the cavity meets the external surface of...

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spectacles

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Bibliography.

Apparently known in China as early as the 13th century, spectacles were invented in the West in the 1280s by a Dominican monk, Alessandro della Spina. Glass-making shops producing lenses ...

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survival rate

Overview page. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology — Bibliography.

A numerical statement of the portion of the population remaining alive at a specified time after a life-threatening exposure or event. It may be a true rate, but often it is a number rather...

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trencher

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Bibliography.

Medieval English;

thick slices of (normally stale) bread, partly hollowed out and used as a plate, commonly given to the poor after the meal. Later replaced by a wooden trencher.

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worm

Overview page. Subjects: Public Health and Epidemiology — Bibliography.

n. any member of several groups of soft-bodied legless animals, including flatworms, nematode worms, earthworms, and leeches, that were formerly thought to be closely related...

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