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Alleluia

Overview page. Subjects: Music — Christianity.

This Lat. form of Hebrew exclamation, meaning ‘Praise Jehovah’, was added to certain of the responds of the RC Church, suitably joyful mus. to be grafted on to traditional plainsong and, in...

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Alline, Henry (1748–1784), evangelist and hymn writer

J. M. Bumsted.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Religion; Composition; Protestantism and Protestant Churches. 1148 words.

Alline, Henry (1748–1784), evangelist and hymn writer, was born in Newport, Rhode Island, on 14 June 1748, the second son of William Alline and Rebecca Clark. His father, who was probably a...

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Anglican Aesthetics

Kenneth Stevenson.

in The Oxford Handbook of Anglican Studies

October 2015; p ublished online July 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Christianity; Religious Subjects in Art; Music and Religion. 5735 words.

This chapter focuses on the applied aesthetics of Anglican worship. As a seventeenth-century development, with definitive roots in the sixteenth-century Reformation, as well as in the...

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Ave maris stella

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity — Music.

A popular Marian hymn, dating at least from the 9th cent. One English translation begins ‘Hail Thou Star of Ocean’.

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Bacon, Thomas

J. A. Leo Lemay.

in American National Biography Online

January 1999; p ublished online February 2000 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Composition; Protestantism and Protestant Churches. 1426 words.

Bacon, Thomas (1700?–26 May 1768), clergyman and musician, is traditionally said to have been born on the Isle of Man, but his earliest records come from Whitehaven, Cumberland County,...

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Bacon, Thomas (1700?–1768), Church of England clergyman and musician

Carole Lynne Price.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Protestantism and Protestant Churches; Strings; Composition. 1022 words.

Bacon, Thomas (1700?–1768), Church of England clergyman and musician, was probably born either in the Isle of Man or Cumberland. He had at least one brother. He is known to have been in...

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Barcroft, George (d. 1610), Church of England clergyman and musician

Roger Bowers.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Protestantism and Protestant Churches; Music Education and Pedagogy; Keyboard. 426 words.

Barcroft, George (d. 1610), Church of England clergyman and musician, is of unknown parentage. From 1565 to 1571 he was a chorister of Winchester Cathedral. He entered Trinity College,...

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Beddome, Benjamin (1717–1795), Particular Baptist minister and hymn writer

W. B. Lowther.

in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography

September 2004; p ublished online September 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Protestantism and Protestant Churches; Religion; Composition. 437 words.

Beddome, Benjamin (1717–1795), Particular Baptist minister and hymn writer, the son of John Beddome (d. 1757), Baptist minister, and Rachel Brandon, was born at Henley in Arden,...

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Benedicamus Domino

Overview page. Subjects: Music — Christianity.

(Lat., ‘Let us bless the Lord’).

A versicle, with the response ‘Deo gratias’ (‘Thanks be to God’), in the liturgy of the Roman rite. It occurs at the end of ...

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Benedicite

Overview page. Subjects: Music — Christianity.

(Lat., ‘bless ye’).

The song of praise beginning ‘O all ye works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord’. It forms part of the Song of the Three Children.

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