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You are looking at 1-10 of 11,852 items for:

Philosophy x History of Western Philosophy x clear all

1

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 900 words.

Heidegger’s discourse in the Black Notebooks is banal in the sense of Hannah Arendt’s notion of the “banality of evil.” This discourse absorbed the doxa of anti-Semitism circulating in...

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10

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 1232 words.

Perhaps rancor—in the sense of bitter disappointment and rage at unjust deception—is a more appropriate term than hatred for describing what infected the West from its beginnings, insofar...

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11

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 1511 words.

Grace, as something that cannot be foreseen requires a flaw, a breach or an insecurity, may be related in Heidegger to what he never ceased calling a task, one that required deferral,...

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12

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 1174 words.

Heidegger’s thought absorbed the lesson of a very ancient history: any true beginning always fails to be such, to truly begin, and must struggle to reinstantiate itself without going astray...

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2

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 1092 words.

Heidegger’s thought begins with a questioning of being, of the difference between being and beings. He intends this thinking of being to provide a new beginning of ontology, or something...

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3

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 879 words.

In the Black Notebooks, Heidegger evokes the Jews and “world Jewry” as the agents of a radical uprooting of the world on a world-historical or “historial” scale. This view reveals in...

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4

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 924 words.

Heidegger’s anti-Semitism is “historial” because it attributes to the Jewish people a task that is both world-historical and philosophically significant, having to do with the uprooting of...

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5

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 1076 words.

For Heidegger in the Black Notebooks, the West is bringing itself to an end, in oblivion, decline, and devastation. This end is understood ontologically also as the possibility of a...

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6

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 1140 words.

For Heidegger, the first beginning is Greek. The beginning is thus brought about by a people, whereas the decline is brought about by the mixing and indistinction of peoples. But this too...

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7

Jean-Luc Nancy and Jeff Fort.

in The Banality of Heidegger

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of Western Philosophy. 1224 words.

Heidegger was perfectly capable of investigating the provenance of anti-Semitism, but he did not. Instead he received his age’s prejudices, and put them to work in his thinking. Why did he...

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