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C1. Introduction

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

in Dante

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 2992 words.

The Introduction suggests that reading The Divine Comedy requires coming to terms not just with Dante’s views on morality, but with the comprehensive metaphysical and theological system...

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C2. Autobiography

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

in Dante

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 5895 words.

‘Autobiography’ takes us through Dante’s works—including The Divine Comedy, Vita nova, and Convivio—and shows that they have one recurrent character, Dante himself. In the Comedy, he is the...

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C3. Truth

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

in Dante

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 5108 words.

‘Truth’ considers the meanings and realities of Dante’s works and his use of allegory. The journey of the Comedy is clearly and precisely located in contemporary geography and cosmology....

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C4. Writing

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

in Dante

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 6680 words.

Dante was a bilingual writer, using Latin for his most scholastic work, but using vernacular Italian for the majority of his writing. ‘Writing’ considers the syntax, metre, and writing...

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C5. Humanity

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

in Dante

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 6307 words.

What does it mean to be human? What is the purpose of human existence? Dante first articulates these questions in the Convivio, but they resurface in the Comedy and in the Monarchia. Dante...

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C6. Politics

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

in Dante

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 5054 words.

In the Comedy, politics and ethics merge into one another: moral reflections lead to political conclusions, and political arguments are couched in strongly moral terms. ‘Politics’ discusses...

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C7. God

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

in Dante

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 5706 words.

The doctrinal passages in Paradiso represent Dante’s view of the fundamental issue of the universe: the relationship between man and God. ‘God’ explains that throughout Paradiso, visual...

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Dante

Peter Hainsworth and David Robey.

February 2015; p ublished online February 2015 .

Book. Subjects: Literature; Literary Studies (Early and Medieval); Christianity. 152 pages.

Dante: A Very Short Introduction examines the main themes and issues that run through all of Dante’s work, ranging from autobiography, to understanding God, and the order of the universe....

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Denys

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity — Literary Studies (Early and Medieval).

(d. c.250),

bishop of Paris, patron of France. According to Gregory of Tours, Denys was born in Italy and sent to convert Gaul with five other bishops. He reached Paris, preached...

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devil

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Studies (Early and Medieval) — Christianity.

The word diabolos is used in the LXX to translate Hebrew Satan, and ‘devil’ is an English alternative used in the NT (e.g. in the temptation narrative, Matt. 4: 1) as an equivalent of...

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