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A

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 21 words.

The first letter of the modern English alphabet was known as ailm [pine] in the ogham alphabet of early Ireland.

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Aaron

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 75 words.

Aaron was the older brother and sometimes spokesman for the Hebrew hero Moses in the Hebrew Bible (Torah).

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Abac

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 5 words.

Irish for Afanc.

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Abandonment

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 91 words.

An important stage of the universal hero myth or monomyth is that of the abandonment of the infant hero to

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Abaris the Hyperborean

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 43 words.

One of the legendary ‘People beyond the North Wind’ in Greek traditions; by historical record he once disputed with Pythagoras.

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Ábartach

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 75 words.

[Ir., feat-performing one].

In the Fenian Cycle he is the son of the King of the Tír Tairngire [Land of

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Abasi Ibom Interacts with Man within Two Universes (Ibibio/Nigeria)

Harold Scheub.

in A Dictionary of African Mythology

January 2000; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 181 words.

Abasi, the supreme being, the god of the sky and earth, the creator and governor of all, lives above the

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Abasi Throws an Ax into a Latrine (Efik/Nigeria)

Harold Scheub.

in A Dictionary of African Mythology

January 2000; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 181 words.

The Efik, who originally lived with other Ibibio groups at Idua, a town near the Oron area, migrated during the

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Abasi's Messenger Is a Vulture (Anang/Nigeria)

Harold Scheub.

in A Dictionary of African Mythology

January 2000; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 169 words.

The supreme god, all knowing, all-seeing, and all-powerful, Abasi moves at times from his place in the sky to the

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Abasi's Sexual Prohibition Is Broken (Efik/Nigeria)

Harold Scheub.

in A Dictionary of African Mythology

January 2000; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 415 words.

Abasi Onyong, the god above, the only deity in the universe, dwells in the sky. He created the world, both

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