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The Evaluation of Regulatory Agencies

Jon Stern.

in The Oxford Handbook of Regulation

September 2010; p ublished online September 2010 .

Article. Subjects: Business and Management; Public Management and Administration; Research Methods. 14768 words.

This article focuses on the economic regulation of infrastructure industries such as electricity, telecommunications, and water and, in particular, on the evaluation of outcomes, rather...

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The Paradox of Health Care Performance Measurement and Management

Jenny M. Lewis.

in The Oxford Handbook of Health Care Management

April 2016; p ublished online June 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Business and Management; Research Methods; Public Management and Administration. 8383 words.

This chapter examines an important paradox of performance measurement and management in health care—the problem of simultaneous overload and deficit. To understand why this paradoxical...

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Public Management

Christopher Hood.

in The Oxford Handbook of Public Management

June 2007; p ublished online September 2009 .

Article. Subjects: Business and Management; Public Management and Administration; Research Methods. 8642 words.

Though authors vary in the detailed definitions of the term “public management” that they offer, most of the standard definitions of public management amount to some variant on “the study...

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The Theory of the Audit Explosion

Michael Power.

in The Oxford Handbook of Public Management

June 2007; p ublished online September 2009 .

Article. Subjects: Business and Management; Public Management and Administration; Research Methods. 7663 words.

This article revisits the main elements of the theory of the audit explosion, critically addressing the extent to which its claims have relevance beyond the UK context. The argument begins...

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