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Critical legal theory

in Philosophy of Law

May 2006; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 4380 words.

‘Critical legal theory’ examines how critical thought repudiates what is taken to be the natural order of things, be it patriarchy (in the case of feminist jurisprudence), the conception of...

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Critical legal theory

in Philosophy of Law

February 2014; p ublished online February 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 5911 words.

‘Critical legal theory’ examines how critical thought repudiates what is taken to be the natural order of things, be it patriarchy (in the case of feminist jurisprudence), the conception of...

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Dworkin: the moral integrity of law

in Philosophy of Law

February 2014; p ublished online February 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 4705 words.

Ronald Dworkin was legal positivism's most tenacious critic. ‘Dworkin: the moral integrity of law’ shows that Dworkin's theory includes not only a stimulating account of law and the legal...

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Law and society

Raymond Wacks.

in Philosophy of Law

May 2006; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 4617 words.

‘Law and society’ examines the sociological approach to law, focusing on the two giants of social theory — Émile Durkheim and Max Weber. It also explains the Marxist materialist account of...

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Law and society

in Philosophy of Law

February 2014; p ublished online February 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 4589 words.

‘Law and society’ examines the sociological approach to law, focusing on the two giants of social theory — Émile Durkheim and Max Weber. It also explains the Marxist materialist account of...

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Law as interpretation

in Philosophy of Law

May 2006; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 3408 words.

‘Law as interpretation’ examines the ideas of the American jurist Ronald Dworkin, whose concept of law continues to exert considerable authority whenever contentious moral and political...

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Legal positivism

in Philosophy of Law

May 2006; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 6140 words.

‘Legal positivism’ describes the essential elements of this important legal theory. It examines classical legal positivism as espoused by its two great protagonists, Jeremy Bentham and John...

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Legal positivism

in Philosophy of Law

February 2014; p ublished online February 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 7170 words.

‘Legal positivism’ examines classical legal positivism as espoused by its two great protagonists, Jeremy Bentham and John Austin, as well as the approaches of modern legal positivists,...

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Natural law

in Philosophy of Law

May 2006; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 4431 words.

Moral questions pervade our lives; they are the stuff of political, and hence legal, debate. ‘Natural law’ asks: Is there an objectively ascertainable measure of right and wrong, good and...

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Natural law

in Philosophy of Law

February 2014; p ublished online February 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Law; Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. 6649 words.

Moral questions pervade our lives; they are the stuff of political, and hence legal, debate. ‘Natural law’ asks: Is there an objectively ascertainable measure of right and wrong, good and...

Go to Very Short Introductions »  abstract