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Afterword

in Forensic Science

February 2010; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 277 words.

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Crime scene management and forensic investigation

in Forensic Science

February 2010; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 3860 words.

‘Crime scene management and forensic investigation’ shows how the actions of police at a crime scene can affect the availability and efficacy of forensic tests later in the investigation....

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Criminology: A Very Short Introduction

Tim Newburn.

April 2018; p ublished online April 2018 .

Book. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 160 pages.

Criminology: A Very Short Introduction considers how to measure crime, how crime trends can be studied, and how those trends can be used to inform preventative policy and...

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DNA: identity, relationships, and databases

in Forensic Science

February 2010; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 4742 words.

‘DNA: identity, relationships, and databases’ looks at the biological basis of DNA profiling and how DNA is analysed and interpreted in different case types. DNA evidence is useful because...

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Drugs: identifying illicit substances

Jim Fraser.

in Forensic Science

February 2010; p ublished online September 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 4458 words.

‘Drugs: identifying illicit substances’ provides an overview of the range and complexity of forensic drug examination. Without accurate identification of suspected drugs, the law cannot be...

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Forensic Science

Jim Fraser.

February 2010; p ublished online September 2013 .

Book. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 160 pages.

Forensic Science: A Very Short Introduction introduces the concept of forensic science and explains how it is used in the investigation of crime. In forensic science, a criminal case can...

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How do we control crime?

Tim Newburn.

in Criminology: A Very Short Introduction

April 2018; p ublished online April 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 4098 words.

‘How do we control crime?’ discusses the formal and less formal means thought to control crime. The formal means refer to the use of the criminal justice system: the police, courts, and...

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How do we measure crime?

Tim Newburn.

in Criminology: A Very Short Introduction

April 2018; p ublished online April 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 4016 words.

‘How do we measure crime?’ considers the two main measures that are generally used for counting crime—information from law enforcement bodies and victimization surveys—looking at the pros...

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How do we prevent crime?

Tim Newburn.

in Criminology: A Very Short Introduction

April 2018; p ublished online April 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 6040 words.

It is often assumed that the criminal justice system is crucial in determining crime levels, but the available evidence does not bear this out. In fact, it is the processes of socialization...

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Introducing criminology

Tim Newburn.

in Criminology: A Very Short Introduction

April 2018; p ublished online April 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Criminal Investigation and Detection. 1207 words.

‘Introducing criminology’ explains that according to American criminologist, Edwin Sutherland, criminology is the body of knowledge regarding crime as a social phenomenon including within...

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