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Antitheses

Jessica Maier.

in Rome Measured and Imagined

May 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 15312 words.

In the late sixteenth century, mapmakers turned away from Bufalini’s timeless fusion as well as his ichnographic language in order to sift through the Roman palimpsest. Their desire to...

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“Before the Eyes of the Whole World”

Jessica Maier.

in Rome Measured and Imagined

May 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 15463 words.

Chapter five traces a splendid sequence of large-scale prints by Antonio Tempesta (1593), Matteo Greuter (1618), Giovanni Battista Falda (1676), and others who turned away from Roma Antica ...

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The Beja in Time and Space

Karen C. Pinto.

in Medieval Islamic Maps

July 2016; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 5245 words.

Chapter Eight, “The Beja in Time and Space” is the first of two chapters pondering a curious anomaly that occurs in every medieval Islamic map of the world. Located on the eastern flank of...

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Chronicles and Histories

Benjamin B. Olshin.

in The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps

October 2014; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 6335 words.

Chapter 5 looks at those materials in the collection that are texts rather than cartographic images. Two documents in the collection seemed to have been written to elucidate the nature of...

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Classical and Medieval Encircling Oceans

Karen C. Pinto.

in Medieval Islamic Maps

July 2016; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 9018 words.

Chapter Six, “Classical and Medieval Encircling Oceans” considers specifically the influence of Greco-Roman and subsequent medieval European cartographic traditions from the perspective of...

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Conclusion

Karen C. Pinto.

in Medieval Islamic Maps

July 2016; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 953 words.

Chapter Thirteen, “Conclusion” wraps up the discussion by discussing the meaning of maps and their multitude of places, spaces, and gazes. It sums up the findings of the book and its new...

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Conclusions and Future Directions

Benjamin B. Olshin.

in The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps

October 2014; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 9404 words.

The final chapter addresses the key questions raised by these cartographic materials. Do these maps and texts connect back to the famed tradition of Marco Polo and his narrative? Are they...

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The Daughters’ Maps

Benjamin B. Olshin.

in The Mysteries of the Marco Polo Maps

October 2014; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 4755 words.

This chapter continues a systematic description of the maps and their intriguing depictions. Here, maps apparently signed by Fantina Polo and Moreta Polo are presented. These works include...

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The Eternal City Measured and Imagined

Jessica Maier.

in Rome Measured and Imagined

May 2015; p ublished online January 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 6275 words.

The flexible, inclusive approach to urban representation of the early modern period was abandoned in the eighteenth century with the publication of Giovanni Battista Nolli’s Pianta grande (...

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How the Beja Capture Imagination

Karen C. Pinto.

in Medieval Islamic Maps

July 2016; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Cartography. 5995 words.

Chapter Nine, “How the Beja Capture Imagination” builds on the answer to Chapter Seven’s query by asking another question. Knowing who the Beja are, we are led to wonder, why are they so...

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