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Afterword: What the Author Thinks

Nayan B. Ruparelia.

in Cloud Computing

April 2016; p ublished online September 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 1572 words.

This chapter discusses some economic, moral, and social issues that technology, IT, and especially cloud computing bring up. Many of these issues are intractable, and this chapter’s...

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Building the <i>Star Trek</i> Computer

Ed Finn.

in What Algorithms Want

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 10395 words.

This chapter explores the ways in which Google, Apple, and other corporations have turned the development of cultural algorithms into epistemological quests for both self-knowledge and...

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Cloud Computing

Nayan B. Ruparelia.

April 2016; p ublished online September 2016 .

Book. Subjects: Programming Languages. 280 pages.

Most of the information available on cloud computing is either highly technical, with details that are irrelevant to non-technologists, or pure marketing hype, in which the cloud is simply...

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Cloud Computing: A Paradigm Shift?

Nayan B. Ruparelia.

in Cloud Computing

April 2016; p ublished online September 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 3006 words.

This chapter addresses the following questions: Why cloud computing? What is so special about cloud computing? How will it affect you, your work, and our society? Just as Microsoft Windows...

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Coda: The Algorithmic Imagination

Ed Finn.

in What Algorithms Want

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 5544 words.

The coda retraces the genealogy of the algorithm to consider our future prospects for achieving the twinned desires embedded in the heart of effective computability: the quest for universal...

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Coding <i>Cow Clicker</i>: The Work of Algorithms

Ed Finn.

in What Algorithms Want

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 12981 words.

Chapter 4 begins with Ian Bogost’s satirical Facebook game Cow Clicker and its send-up of the “gamification” movement to add quantification and algorithmic thinking to many facets of...

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Contextualizing Ubiquitous Computing

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell.

in Divining a Digital Future

April 2011; p ublished online August 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 14488 words.

This chapter begins with a discussion of Weiser’s classic article in Scientific American (1991) that laid the foundations for a research program in ubicomp, then turning its attention to...

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Counting Bitcoin

Ed Finn.

in What Algorithms Want

March 2017; p ublished online September 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 11075 words.

This chapter uses the growing dominance of algorithmic high frequency trading in finance to frame a reading of Bitcoin and related cryptocurrencies. By defining the unit of exchange through...

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Divining a Digital Future

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell.

April 2011; p ublished online August 2013 .

Book. Subjects: Programming Languages. 264 pages.

Ubiquitous computing (or ubicomp) is the label for a “third wave” of computing technologies. Following the eras of the mainframe computer and the desktop PC, it is characterized by small...

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Domesticity and Its Discontents

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell.

in Divining a Digital Future

April 2011; p ublished online August 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Programming Languages. 9586 words.

This chapter examines the interplay between technology and the home’s social and moral organization, focusing on the fact that “the home” is a highly variable cultural object, in physical,...

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