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Business and Management x Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Growth and Fluctuations x clear all

CARTELS AND PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE IMPACT OF CARTELS ON PRODUCTIVITY IN THE NETHERLANDS

Lilian T.D. Petit, Ron G.M. Kemp and Jarig van Sinderen.

in Journal of Competition Law & Economics

June 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Antitrust Issues and Policies; Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Growth and Fluctuations; Production and Organizations. 8282 words.

Currently, there are only a few empirical studies that have studied the possible consequences of cartels on productivity growth. Empirical insights about cartels would be critical for...

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COUNTER-INTUITIVE FAIRNESS IN ANTITRUST: PROTECTING THE MONOPOLIST AND BALANCING AMONG COMPETING CLAIMS

Adi Ayal.

in Journal of Competition Law & Economics

September 2012; p ublished online July 2012 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Antitrust Issues and Policies; Financial Regulation; Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Growth and Fluctuations; Market Structure and Pricing. 17226 words.

Antitrust originated in popular resistance to 17th century Royal Grants and 19th century economic power. This article contends that much of the guiding force of today's antitrust policy...

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Governance, regulation and financial market instability: the implications for policy

Sue Konzelmann, Frank Wilkinson, Marc Fovargue-Davies and Duncan Sankey.

in Cambridge Journal of Economics

September 2010; p ublished online February 2010 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles; Money and Interest Rates; Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Growth and Fluctuations; Corporate Regulation; History of Financial Markets and Institutions; Capitalist Systems. 14440 words.

Just as the 1929 Stock Market Crash discredited Classical economic theory and policy and opened the way for Keynesianism, a consequence of the collapse of confidence in financial markets...

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