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Behaviour in the macroeconomy

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 4407 words.

Behavioural macroeconomics has significant constraints, reflecting the difficulty of bringing together the choices of different people with widely different personality types, moods, and...

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Behavioural Economics

Michelle Baddeley.

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Book. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 168 pages.

Behavioural Economics: A Very Short Introduction introduces the field of behavioural economics, analysing the motivations behind economic decisions and showing the relevance of behavioural...

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Economic behaviour and public policy

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 2939 words.

At its best, economics can help policy-makers to design policies that resolve a wide range of economic and financial problems, for individuals and economies as a whole. ‘Economic behaviour...

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Economics and behaviour

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 1891 words.

Why is there so much interest in behavioural economics and how is it different? ‘Economics and behaviour’ explains how behavioural economists bring economics together with insights from...

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Motivation and incentives

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 3271 words.

Incentives are the fundamental driver in economic analysis. Money is often the main incentive, but a complex range of other socio-economic and psychological factors also drive our...

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Personalities, moods, and emotions

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 5205 words.

‘Personalities, moods, and emotions’ explains how and why psychological factors affect our economic and financial decision-making. It looks at measuring personality through OCEAN tests that...

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Quick thinking

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 4344 words.

Deciding quickly is difficult when we face information and choice overload so in much of our everyday decision-making we use quick rules. ‘Quick thinking’ explores some of these...

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Risky choices

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 5585 words.

When we decide to cross the road, buy a lottery ticket, or invest our money, the decision involves risk and uncertainty. ‘Risky choices’ looks at how economists usually think of risk as...

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Social lives

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 4786 words.

‘Social lives’ explores some of the main ways in which social influences drive behaviour, including aversion to unequal outcomes, trust and reciprocity, social learning, and peer pressure....

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Taking time

Michelle Baddeley.

in Behavioural Economics

January 2017; p ublished online January 2017 .

Chapter. Subjects: Behavioural Finance. 4379 words.

Often our everyday decisions unfold over time and what we want today is not always consistent with what we might want tomorrow. Understanding why many people do not behave in a way that is...

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