Oxford Index Browse

You are looking at 1-10 of 26 items for:

Sociology x Sports and Exercise Medicine x clear all

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

achieved status

Overview page. Subjects: Sociology — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A high social status acquired by individual effort or open competition (for example, through winning at sport), rather than from the status the person is born with. Compare ascribed status.

null...

See overview in Oxford Index

athleticism

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Sport and Leisure.

Devotion to or emphasis on physical fitness. Athleticism and an enthusiasm for sporting activities was a component of so-called ‘muscular Christianity': a loosely knit movement at the end...

See overview in Oxford Index

callisthenics

Overview page. Subjects: Sport and Leisure — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

Systematic, rhythmic, light exercises, such as abdominal curls and push-ups, that utilize the weight of the body as resistance. Callisthenics are designed to tone and strengthen muscles,...

See overview in Oxford Index

civilizing process

Overview page. Subjects: Sport and Leisure — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

The historical process by which people have acquired a greater capacity for controlling their emotions. Associated with the civilizing process has been a lower tolerance of anti-social...

See overview in Oxford Index

comeback

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Sport and Leisure.

In sport, the relaunch of a sports career for a once-retired athlete.

See overview in Oxford Index

crowd

Overview page. Subjects: Sociology — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A relatively unstructured mass of people who group together in a given area in a more or less spontaneous way, for a short time, in response to an attraction, such as a sports event.

See overview in Oxford Index

cultural diffusion

Overview page. Subjects: Sport and Leisure — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A social process resulting in the transfer of beliefs, values, and social activities (e.g. games or sports) from one society to another.

See overview in Oxford Index

deviance amplification

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Sociology.

Introduced by Leslie Wilkins in his book Social Deviance (1967), the concept suggests that a small initial deviation may spiral into ever-increasing significance through processes of...

See overview in Oxford Index

domination

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Sociology.

Rule by coercion or noncoercive compliance. Individuals or groups may exercise power over others—domination—either by brute force or because that power is accepted as legitimate by those...

See overview in Oxford Index

drill

Overview page. Subjects: Sport and Leisure — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

1 A precise, well-defined motor skill practised repeatedly.

2 A pre-determined series of actions.

See overview in Oxford Index