Overview

Anglo-Saxon art and architecture

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baluster-shaft

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

1 Short, thick colonnette with pronounced entasis between openings (usually in towers) in Anglo-Saxon architecture.

2 Baluster-column in...

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buttress

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Pier-like projection of brick, masonry, or other material, built either in close connection with a wall needing extra stability, or standing isolated, to counter the outward thrust of an...

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Celt

Overview page. Subjects: British History.

From the 5th cent. bc, Greek ethnographers described the Celts as one of the major ethnic groups of central and western Europe, locating them inland from Marseilles. Caesar in De bello...

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church

Overview page. Subjects: History.

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A building belonging to an established religious organization and used for collective Christian worship, the performance of ceremonies, pilgrimage, and the veneration of...

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crypt

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

[Greek kryptē, ‘hidden’] An accessible space beneath the ground floor of a church. Most crypts are situated under the sanctuary and contain a focus of veneration, usually a saint’s tomb ...

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Danish knot

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Complicated intertwining tendrils of foliate Anglo-Saxon and Celtic ornament. Also called Runic knot.

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Hiberno-Romanesque

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Style of ecclesiastical buildings in Ireland from C10 to C12 characterized by very simple rectangular buildings, tall detached circular towers with conical roofs, semicircular-headed...

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high cross

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

Free-standing detached sculpted stone cross, usually Celtic or Anglo-Saxon. There are many examples in Ireland (e.g. Monasterboice, Co. Louth (C9 or C10), and Scotland (e.g. Ruthwell, near...

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illuminated manuscripts

Overview page. Subjects: Bibliography.

Books written by hand, decorated with pictures and ornaments of different kinds. The word ‘illuminated’ comes from a usage of the Latin word illuminare in connection with oratory or prose...

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interlace

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) — Art.

Carved ornament of crossed and recrossed cords or bands arranged like a single piece of flexible material returning upon itself, like unravelled knots. Called entrelacs, it is common in...

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