Overview

ascomycete

Return to overview »

Results | All related links for this item | 1-16 of 16 results for:

Overview x clear all

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

ascocarp

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

The reproductive body of fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, which contains ascus cells. An ascocarp may be a closed sphere (cleistothecium), a flask-shaped structure ( perithecium) with a...

See overview in Oxford Index

ascolichen

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

Any lichen in which the mycobiont is an ascomycete.

See overview in Oxford Index

ascus

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

(pl. asci)

A specialized cell in fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, which contains two haploid nuclei that fuse during sexual reproduction and then undergo meiosis, giving rise to...

See overview in Oxford Index

bell morel

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

The common name for the fruit body of the ascomycetous fungus Verpa conica (order Pezizales). It is rare in Britain.

See overview in Oxford Index

candle-snuff fungus

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

The antler-shaped fruiting structures of the ascomycete Xylaria hypoxylon.

See overview in Oxford Index

dead man's fingers

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

The common name for the finger-like stromata of the ascomycete Xylaria polymorpha.

See overview in Oxford Index

ergot

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Science and Mathematics.

n. a fungus (Claviceps purpurea) that grows on rye. It produces several important alkaloids, chemically related to LSD, including ergotamine and ergometrine, which are used in...

See overview in Oxford Index

fruit body

Overview page. Subjects: Environmental Science — Biological Sciences.

(fruiting body)

A differentiated, spore-bearing structure, particularly the ascocarps and basidiocarps of ascomycetes and basidiomycetes.

See overview in Oxford Index

fungi

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

A group of organisms formerly classified in the kingdom Fungi. Molecular studies have shown that fungi are more closely related to animals than plants, and both fungi and animals are now...

See overview in Oxford Index

lichen

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

A group of organisms that are symbiotic associations (see symbiosis) between a fungus (usually one of the Ascomycota) and a green alga or a cyanobacterium. The fungal partner (mycobiont)...

See overview in Oxford Index

orange-peel fungus

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

The common name for the fruit bodies resembling orange peel of the ascomycete Aleuria aurantia. See Aleuria.

See overview in Oxford Index

phycomycetes

Overview page. Subjects: Biological Sciences.

In older classification schemes, all primitive fungi, many of which are found in water (e.g. the water moulds, which may be parasitic on fish) or in damp areas. Many are unicellular but...

See overview in Oxford Index

pseudo-epithecium

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

In the fruiting bodies of certain ascomycetes, a layer above the hymenium consisting of the tips of paraphyses in an amorphous matrix.

See overview in Oxford Index

Taphrinales

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

(subdivision Ascomycetales)

An order of fungi that are parasitic on a range of flowering plants. Ascocarps are not formed, the asci developing from hyphae or from cells produced by...

See overview in Oxford Index

trichogyne

Overview page. Subjects: Plant Sciences and Forestry.

An extension, often hair-like, from the female gametangium that receives the male gamete or nucleus prior to fertilization. It is found in certain green and red algae (Chlorophyta and...

See overview in Oxford Index

yeast

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Science and Mathematics.

n. any of a group of fungi in which the body (mycelium) consists of individual cells, which may occur singly, in groups of two or three, or in chains. Yeasts reproduce by...

See overview in Oxford Index