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Bough of Dathí

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

English translation of bile Dathí, the ash tree belonging to Dathí or Nathi, a nephew of Niall Noígiallach [of the Nine Hostages], one of the six wondrous trees of Ireland. See also ASH;...

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fairy tree

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Almost all kinds of tree found in the Celtic countries have been thought to have special powers or to serve as the abode of the fairies, especially the magical trio of oak, ash, and thorn....

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leaves

Overview page.

A number of beliefs centre on plant leaves. The simplest, which is still practised, is that it is lucky to catch a falling leaf before it reaches the ground. The first known mention is from...

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Lent

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity — Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

In the west, the 40-day period of fasting before Easter, beginning with Ash Wednesday. (Sundays are not counted.) Each day has its own proper prayers, lessons, and chants. Penitential...

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Llinon

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Welsh name for the Shannon River. Uncapitalized, the word llinon means ‘spear’, ‘ash’.

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N

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The fourteenth letter of the modern English alphabet and the thirteenth of the ancient Roman one, representing the Greek and the Semitic nūn.

N or M the answer to the first...

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oak

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Powerful trees which grew extensively in OT times, and those on the plain of Sharon were comparable to the great forest of Lebanon (Isa. 35: 2). Some oaks were invested with a kind of...

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rowan

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

This tree is traditionally a protection against witchcraft. The name (which is recorded from the late 15th century, originally Scots and northern English) is of Scandinavian origin.

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Shrove Tuesday

Overview page. Subjects: History — Religion.

The day immediately before Ash Wednesday, so named from the ‘shriving’, i.e. confession and absolution, of the faithful on that day.

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tree

Overview page. Subjects: Arts and Humanities.

A large, perennial, woody plant that usually has one main trunk, a number of branches, and a crown of foliage.

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wart

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

A benign tumour that results from the infection of a single basal cell of the skin by a papillomavirus, which causes excessive proliferation in the stratum corneum.

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