Overview

deus ex machina

Return to overview »

Results | All related links for this item | 1-7 of 7 results for:


Refine by type

Refine by product

 

coup de théâtre

Overview page. Subjects: Theatre — Literature.

[koo dĕ tay-ahtr]

A sudden, surprising turn of events that gives a new twist to the plot of a play. Typical coups de théâtre involve the unveiling of a disguised character or the...

See overview in Oxford Index

denouement

Overview page. Subjects: Media Studies.

[French ‘unravelling’]

In a narrative or drama, the final resolution of the conflicts, mysteries, or misunderstandings in the plot; the tying up of loose ends, typically in a final...

See overview in Oxford Index

Euripides

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(480–c. 406 bc),

Greek dramatist. His nineteen surviving plays show important innovations in the handling of traditional myths, such as the introduction of realism, an interest in...

See overview in Oxford Index

flying

Overview page. Subjects: Theatre.

Have been achieved in the theatre since the earliest times. The Greeks had the deus ex machina; in liturgical drama, and later in the Renaissance theatre, flying effects varied from ...

null...

See overview in Oxford Index

machinery

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

The collective term applied since the 18th century to the supernatural beings—gods, angels, devils, nymphs, etc.—who take part in the action of an epic or mock‐epic poem or in a dramatic...

See overview in Oxford Index

mechane

Overview page. Subjects: Theatre.

A large crane used by 435 bc in the Athenian Theatre of Dionysus for the sudden airborne entrances of divinities or the magical transportation of tragic and para-tragic comic heroes. ...

null...

See overview in Oxford Index

theatre

Overview page. Subjects: Theatre.

Building for the public enjoyment of drama, etc. Antique Classical theatres were planned as segments of a circle, the seats rising in concentric tiers above and behind one another around...

See overview in Oxford Index