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antonomasia

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

[an‐ton‐ŏ‐may‐ziă]

A figure of speech that replaces a proper name with an epithet (the Bard for Shakespeare), official address (His Holiness for a pope), or other indirect...

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formulaic

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Characterized by the repetition of certain stock phrases, known as formulae. Many orally composed poems, especially epics, are formulaic in that they repeatedly use the same epithets and...

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hypallage

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(from a Greek word meaning ‘exchange’), a transference of epithet, as ‘Sansfoy's dead dowry’ for ‘dead Sansfoy's dowry’ (Spenser).

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invective

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies — Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

Is literature which, having regard to the customs and convictions of a given society, sets out to denigrate a named individual. Such denigration or abuse follows well‐articulated rhetorical...

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poetic diction

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

A term used to mean language and usage peculiar to poetry, which came into prominence with Wordsworth's discussion in his preface (1800) to the Lyrical Ballads, in which he claims to have...

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prolepsis

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

An anticipation, either in rhetoric or in narrative: thus the use of a descriptive term prior to the circumstances that would make it truly applicable (Hamlet: ‘I am dead, Horatio’) ...

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trope

Overview page. Subjects: Music.

Rhetorical figures of speech that can be found not just in written and spoken language but in all forms of communication. Traditionally the four ‘master tropes’ are regarded as being:...

See overview in Oxford Index