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hubris

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hamartia

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Term used by Aristotle to denote the error or failure (the ‘fatal flaw’) that leads the central figure of a tragedy to eventual catastrophe.

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Nemesis

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

Europe

A Greek goddess unsuccessfully pursued by Zeus. But most of her actions are simply connected with retribution, the ‘unescapable’ punishment of human presumption.

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Pheidon

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

King of Argos (2), who ended up as a tyrant (Aristotle Politica 1310b). According to Herodotus (1) (6. 127) he acted ‘with the most hubris of all the Greeks’, and ...

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rape

Overview page. Subjects: Law — Arts and Humanities.

See heterosexuality; hubris; Sabini; sexuality; and E. M. Harris, Classical Quarterly 1990; S. Cole, Classical Philology 1984; S. Deacy and K. Pierce, Rape in Antiquity (1997).

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Salmoneus

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

A son of Aeolus (1). Homer calls Salmoneus ‘blameless’ (Odyssey 11. 235f.), but post-Homeric tradition pictures him as the eponymous king of Salmone in Elis, who in a case of ...

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shame

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

See hubris; Nemesis; Pudicitia; suicide; also D. L. Cairns, Aidos (1993) and B. Williams, Shame and Necessity (1993).

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sin

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Buddhism does not accept the existence of an omnipotent deity and has no concept of sin as the offence against such a being by the contravention of his will as expressed through revelation...

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theodicy

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The part of theology concerned with defending the goodness and omnipotence of God in the face of the suffering and evil of the world. See evil, problem of; free will defence.

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tragedy

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

A serious drama with an unhappy ending involving the downfall of the protagonist. One of Frye's four main literary genres, the others being comedy, romance, and satire. For Aristotle, this...

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tragic flaw

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

A term used by some modern critics to denote what they interpret as the defect of character that brings about the protagonist's downfall in a tragedy: Othello's jealousy is a famous...

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