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hypertrophy

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atrophy

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

The wasting away of tissue with loss of mass and/or function. Compare aplasia, in which the tissue does not develop.

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calcium-channel blocker

Overview page. Subjects: Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

A compound (calcium antagonist) that blocks or inhibits movement of calcium ions across membranes. Most are potent vasodilators and some are antiarrhythmic. Examples include nifedipine,...

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Dupuytren's contracture

Overview page. Subjects: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

(dew-pwee-trahnz)

a flexion deformity of the fingers (usually the ring and little fingers) caused by a nodular hypertrophy and contracture of the fascia in the palm and fingers....

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gingival enlargement

Overview page. Subjects: Dentistry.

A swelling of the gingival tissues. There may be an increase in the size of the fibrous tissue cells (hypertrophy) or an increase in their number (hyperplasia). It can be drug induced e.g....

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hyperplasia

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

(hy-per-play-ziă)

the increased production and growth of normal cells in a tissue or organ. benign prostatic h. see prostate gland. See also endometrial (hyperplasia). Compare...

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megaloglossia

Overview page. Subjects: Dentistry.

A form of macroglossia due to enlargement (hypertrophy) of the tongue muscle.

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Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome

Overview page. Subjects: Dentistry.

[E. G. Melkersson (1898–1932), Swedish physician; C. Rosenthal (1892–1937), German neurologist] A rare neurological disorder characterized by recurring facial paralysis, swelling of the...

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Ménétrier's disease

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

A disorder in which gross enlargement (see hypertrophy) of the cells of the mucous membrane lining the stomach is associated with anaemia. Prominent gastric folds are seen at endoscopy or...

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Moritani and de Vries model

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A model used to estimate the relative contributions of muscle growth (see hypertrophy) and neural factors to strength gains. Moritani and de Vries measured force production and neural...

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muscle growth

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

An increase in muscle volume, which may occur by hypertrophy and/or hyperplasia.

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muscle pumping

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A temporary increase in muscle size during a single bout of exercise in which comparatively light weights are lifted many times in succession. The size increase results mainly from fluid...

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myofibril splitting

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine.

Longitudinal splitting of a myofibril into two or more daughter myofibrils. This increases the total number of myofibrils within a muscle fibre, enabling the fibre to increase its...

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myogenic factor

Overview page. Subjects: Chemistry — Sports and Exercise Medicine.

A factor inherent in, or derived from, the activity of a muscle. Muscle hypertrophy is an example of a myogenic factor contributing to muscle strength. See also neurogenic factor.

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neoplasia

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health.

n. a form of abnormal growth that is independent of the body’s normal homeostatic growth-regulating mechanisms, continues after the initiating stimulus has been removed, and is...

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strength

Overview page. Subjects: Sports and Exercise Medicine — Dentistry.

Strength through joy the promotion of physical and cultural recreational activities among working people, from the name of Kraft durch Freude, a movement founded in Germany by the National...

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