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Aelius Paetus, Sextus

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 105)

a Roman lawyer nicknamed ‘Catus’ (clever) for his shrewd pragmatism, was consul in 198 bc. He was the author of Tripertita, so called because it contained three elements...

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Aelius Tubero, Quintus

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 156)

son of Lucius (above), accompanied his father 49–48 bc and fought at Pharsalus, but was pardoned by Caesar. In 46 he prosecuted Q. Ligarius (whom Cicero successfully...

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Antistius Labeo, Marcus

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

Was a leading Roman lawyer in the time of Augustus. His father, also a lawyer, was killed fighting for the republican cause. As a member of a commission to reconstitute the senate in 18 bc...

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Ateius Capito, Gaius

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 8)

a lawyer of modest senatorial family, was a follower of Ofilius, became consul in ad 5 and was supervisor of the water supply (curator aquarum, see cura(tio)) from ...

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Cervidius Scaevola, Quintus

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 1)

a leading Roman lawyer of the later 2nd cent. ad, probably came from Carthage and, through his wife, had a close connection with Nemausus (Nîmes). Perhaps a pupil ...

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Gnaeus Flavius

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 15)

who lived around 300 bc, was the son of a freedman of Appius Claudius Caecus, whose secretary he became. Sextus Pomponius says that he purloined and published a ...

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legal literature

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

Is the works of lawyers which went beyond mere collections of laws and formulae. Legal literature was the most specifically Roman branch of Latin literature, and until the Byzantine age...

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Manilius Manius

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 12),

unsuccessfully fought against the Lusitani (see Lusitania) as proconsul 155 or 154 bc, but became consul 149, perhaps because of his work as a jurist. With his colleague...

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Masurius Sabinus

Overview page. Subjects: History of Law — Classical Studies.

(RE 29),

probably from Verona, a leading Roman lawyer of the first half of the 1st cent. ad. He was successful as a law teacher in Rome and counted the ...

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Mucius Scaevola, Quintus

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 22)

(cf. preceding article), son of P. Mucius Scaevola, whom he surpassed both as an orator and a lawyer. In his most famous case, the causa Curiana (Cicero De ...

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Plautius

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 60),

a Roman lawyer of the later 1st cent. ad, known only through excerpts in Justinian's Digest (see Justinian's codification) from commentaries on his work by L. Neratius...

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Proculus, Sempronius (?)

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 9a)

a Roman lawyer of the mid-1st cent. ad, perhaps from Spain, who gave his name to the Proculian school, which emphasized principle and consistency, in contrast with that ...

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restitution

Overview page. Subjects: Law.

N.

The return of property to the owner or person entitled to possession. If one person has unjustifiably received either property or money from another, he has an obligation to...

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Titius Aristo

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(RE 27a)

a Roman lawyer of high repute but possibly low birth, alive in ad 105. He learned from C. Cassius Longinus (2), was expert in public and private law ...

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vīgintīsexvirī, vīgintīvirī

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

Six boards of minor magistrates at Rome were known by the collective designation vigintisexviri (the Twenty‐Six) in the late republic: membership was a precursor to the quaestorship and the...

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