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stratigraphic trap

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anticlinal trap

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.

A fold structure with an arch of non-porous rock overlying porous strata (reservoir rock), providing a trap in which oil, gas, or water may accumulate. In Middle East oilfields, large,...

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combination trap

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.

Oil, gas, or water trap combining structural and stratigraphic features. See also structural trap; and stratigraphic trap.

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fault trap

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.

Structure in which water, oil, or gas may be trapped on one side of a fault plane by an impervious horizon thrown above it by a fault. Compare anticlinal trap; reef trap; stratigraphic...

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reef trap

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.

Stratigraphic oil or gas trap produced by porous reef limestones (reservoir rock) covered by impermeable strata. Porosity of limestones depends on post-depositional diagenetic changes. A...

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structural trap

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography — Ecology and Conservation.

A trap formed by the deformation of porous and non-porous strata as a result of folding, faulting, etc., in which oil, gas, or water may accumulate.

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unconformity trap

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography — Ecology and Conservation.

A stratigraphic trap formed by the folding, uplift, and erosion of porous strata, followed by the deposition of later beds which can act as a seal for oil, gas or water. Although common...

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wedge-edge trap

Overview page. Subjects: Earth Sciences and Geography.

A stratigraphic trap in porous beds, in the form of an inclined wedge, which may trap oil, gas, or water at its upper end. See natural gas; petroleum; and porosity.

See overview in Oxford Index