Overview

visual cortex

Return to overview »

Results | All related links for this item | 1-20 of 28 results for:


Show only full text

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

achromatopsia

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology — Medicine and Health.

n. the inability to differentiate different shades of colour. Such complete colour blindness is very rare and is usually associated with poor visual acuity, nystagmus, and...

See overview in Oxford Index

akinetopsia

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A perceptual defect characterized by an inability to perceive motion, objects being visible while at rest but movement causing them to disappear, invariably associated with a lesion in Area...

See overview in Oxford Index

binocular cell

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A neuron in the visual cortex that receives inputs from both eyes. Approximately half the neurons in the primary visual cortex are binocular. See also disparity-selective cell, ocular...

See overview in Oxford Index

binocular disparity

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

The slight discrepancy between the two retinal images of a three-dimensional object or scene, caused by binocular parallax and providing the basis for stereopsis, certain...

See overview in Oxford Index

blindsight

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Residual vision in the absence of a functioning primary visual cortex in primates and possibly other animals. More specifically, a capacity possessed by some people who appear to be totally...

See overview in Oxford Index

blob

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Any of the ovoid (egg-shaped) areas in the primary visual cortex (Area V1), about a quarter of a millimetre in diameter and separated by half-millimetre interblobs, containing neurons with...

See overview in Oxford Index

cerebral cortex

Overview page. Subjects: Medicine and Health — Psychology.

The outer layer or ‘bark’ (from the Greek) of the brain, associated with sensory perception and the higher mental functions. It appeared late in evolution, and is especially developed in...

See overview in Oxford Index

chromatopsia

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A form of partial blindness characterized by loss or serious impairment of all aspects of vision except colour perception, resulting in a form of misidentification exemplified by guessing...

See overview in Oxford Index

colour constancy

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

The tendency for an object or a surface to retain approximately the same apparent colour as the amount and wavelength of light reflected from it changes under varying conditions of...

See overview in Oxford Index

cortical blindness

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Any form of blindness, such as achromatopsia, caused by damage to the visual cortex.

See overview in Oxford Index

Cyclopean eye

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A hypothetical brain structure where the images from both eyes are brought together, believed by the French philosopher René Descartes (1596–1650) to be the pineal gland, by virtue of its...

See overview in Oxford Index

disparity-selective cell

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A binocular cell in the visual cortex that receives inputs from both eyes and responds only when the binocular disparity is within certain predetermined limits, thus providing a basis for...

See overview in Oxford Index

feature detector

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A neuron that responds selectively to a specific feature (1) of its input, such as an edge detector, a bar detector, or a cell specified for facial recognition in the visual association...

See overview in Oxford Index

fusiform gyrus

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A spindle-shaped gyrus on the medial (inside) surface of each temporal lobe, at the junction with the occipital lobe, occupied by Area V4 of the visual cortex, largely responsible for...

See overview in Oxford Index

grandmother cell

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Based on the discovery of feature detectors, a hypothetical cell (improbably exaggerated, but based on reality) in the visual cortex that might respond maximally to a highly specific...

See overview in Oxford Index

illusory contour

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A visual contour in the absence of a lightness or colour gradient in the stimulus, computed in Area V2 of the visual cortex, generating form perception without a corresponding retinal...

See overview in Oxford Index

Kanizsa triangle

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

A visual illusion of a triangle without a corresponding retinal image, induced by three dark Pac-Man icons at the corners of an imaginary triangle, oriented to give the impression that they...

See overview in Oxford Index

middle temporal gyrus

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

The middle of the three gyri on the lateral surface of each temporal lobe, running horizontally between the superior temporal gyrus (temporal operculum) and the inferior temporal gyrus,...

See overview in Oxford Index

MT

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

Median or middle temporal, another name for Area V5 of the visual cortex, receiving inputs chiefly from the magnocellular system, concerned mainly with movement perception. Also called MT/V5null...

See overview in Oxford Index

ocular dominance

Overview page. Subjects: Psychology.

The degree to which a binocular cell located in the visual cortex and receiving inputs from both eyes responds primarily to one eye or the other, usually measured on a seven-point scale in...

See overview in Oxford Index