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Thomas Babington Macaulay

(1800—1859) historian, essayist, and poet

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Abraham Hayward

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(1801–84)

Essayist, educated at Blundell School, Tiverton. He was called to the bar in 1832. Author of The Art of Dining (1852), his gastronomic dinners in his chambers were famous...

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Algernon Sidney

Overview page. Subjects: Philosophy.

(1622–83),

the grandnephew of Sir P. Sidney, took up arms against Charles I and was wounded at Marston Moor. He was employed on government service until the Restoration, but his...

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Anthony Trollope

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(1815–82),

became a junior clerk in the General Post Office in London in 1834, but only began to make any professional progress when transferred to Ireland in 1841. He married Rose...

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Byronic

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Characteristic of or resembling Byron or his poetry; that is, contemptuous of and rebelling against conventional morality, or defying fate, or possessing the characteristics of Byron's...

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Chapman's New Zealand Monthly Magazine

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Literary, Scientific, and Miscellaneous was a journal of 1850, its title reflecting the name of its publisher, Geo. T. Chapman, an Auckland bookseller. Its aim as stated in its first ...

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Charles Meryon

Overview page. Subjects: Art.

(1821–68).

French etcher. Meryon was born in Paris, the illegitimate son of an English doctor and a French dancer; his early career was spent as a French naval officer. His ...

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Charles Seymour

Overview page. Subjects: British History.

(1662–1748). Charles Seymour succeeded to the dukedom at the age of 16 when his elder brother was shot in Italy, and married the heiress to the vast Percy estates. He was gentleman of the...

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Clapham Sect

Overview page. Subjects: Christianity — British History.

An influential evangelical network whose activity in the early 19th cent. found a base in Clapham. The name was popularized and perhaps coined by Sir James Stephen in the Edinburgh Review...

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coffee houses

Overview page. Subjects: Literature — History.

The first coffee house in England was reputedly established in London in 1650 at the Angel. They became popular after the Restoration and remained so during the 18th century. The fashion...

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Dorothy Osborne

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

(1627–95),

married William Temple in 1654. Her letters to him during the period 1652–4 were published in an edition by Parry (1888), followed by G. C. Moore‐Smith's more scholarly...

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