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Alfred Waterhouse

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

 (1830–1905) English architect.

Following articles in Manchester, Waterhouse travelled in France, Germany, and Italy, gaining a wide experience of Gothic architecture that would...

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ashlar

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

1 Class of masonry consisting of blocks of accurately dressed, cut, squared, and finished stone (the Roman opus quadratum), faced and with clean sharp arrises, forming perfect...

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Auguste Perret

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

(1874–1954).

French architect and building contractor. He and his brothers Gustave (1876–1952) and Claude (1880–1960) were among the first to exploit the architectural...

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bourdaloue

Overview page. Subjects: Art.

An oval-shaped chamber pot, usually of porcelain, used mainly by ladies when travelling. It was named after Louis Bourdaloue (1632–1704), a French Jesuit preacher, whose sermons were so...

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Brussels pottery

Overview page. Subjects: Art.

A pottery factory was founded in Brussels in 1705 producing faience wares from 1724. Particularly notable were large tureens and vessels in natural forms, such as cabbages, melons, ducks,...

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Cass Gilbert

Overview page. Subjects: Art — Architecture.

 (1858–1934) US architect.

Gilbert studied at MIT (1878–9) and served his apprenticeship with McKim, Mead, and White in New York (1880–82); his career suggests an American...

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ceramics

Overview page. Subjects: Art — Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

[from the Greek keramos, ‘potter's earth’]

A clay-based product, usually divided into pottery (such as earthenware, stoneware, and faience) and porcelain (soft-paste, hard-paste,...

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earthenware

Overview page. Subjects: Decorative Arts, Furniture, and Industrial Design.

Baked clay, used primarily for pottery, sometimes for sculpture, which is fired at a relatively low temperature. It remains porous until it is glazed. Creamware, maiolica, faience, and...

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écuelle

Overview page. Subjects: Art.

A shallow, two-handled bowl and cover, used for individual servings of soup. Usually made of silver or porcelain, occasionally faience, it was a popular shape in France in the 18th century.

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ewer

Overview page. Subjects: Decorative Arts, Furniture, and Industrial Design.

A large jug, dating from the Middle Ages, used for pouring water for washing hands. Usually of globular shape, with loop handle and small spout, elaborate ewers were made in France, in the...

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