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triglyph

Michael Clarke and Deborah Clarke.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theory of Art. 31 words.

[from the Greek, ‘three channels’]

The vertical block in a Doric *frieze, separating the *metopes. Strictly

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abated

James Stevens Curl and Susan Wilson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 16 words.

Stone surface cut away, leaving a design in low *relief (e.g. a *Greek-*Doric *metope

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triglyph

James Stevens Curl and Susan Wilson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 67 words.

Upright block occurring in series in a *Doric *frieze: flanking *metopes, triglyphs possibly suggest the

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intersectio

James Stevens Curl and Susan Wilson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 14 words.

Space between *dentils or *triglyphs (i.e. *metope) in a *Doric *entablature.

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triglyph

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 77 words.

One of the upright blocks occurring in series in a Doric frieze on either side of the metopes, possibly

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glyph

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 31 words.

Channel, flute, or groove, normally vertical, as in a Doric frieze, where the blocks framing metopes are the

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Bucranium

in Grove Art Online

August 1996; p ublished online January 1998 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Art. 27 words.

Motif based on the horned skull of an ox, frequently used to decorate the metopes of a Roman Doric frieze.

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bucranium

Michael Clarke and Deborah Clarke.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theory of Art. 33 words.

An ox-skull, usually garlanded, often carved in the *metopes of a *Doric frieze. Also frequently used as an

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Bucranium

Edited by Gordon Campbell.

in The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Ancient and Classical Art (to 500 CE). 25 words.

[bucrane; Gr. boukranion: ‘oxhead’].

Motif based on the horned skull of an ox, frequently used to decorate the metopes

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abated

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Stone surface cut away or lowered, leaving a sculpted design in low relief (e.g. on the metope of a Greek Doric temple).

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abated

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 23 words.

Stone surface cut away or lowered, leaving a sculpted design in low relief (e.g. on the metope of a Greek

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triglyph

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

[from the Greek, ‘three channels’]

The vertical block in a Doric frieze, separating the metopes. Strictly speaking it consists of two whole grooves with a half-length groove on...

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glyph

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Channel, flute, or groove, normally vertical, as in a Doric frieze, where the blocks framing metopes are the triglyphs so called because they each have two glyphs and two half-glyphs.

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bucrane

Overview page. Subjects: Art — Architecture.

. (pl. bucranes, bucrania).

Ornament in the form of an ox-skull or head frequently associated with festoons and garlands, found especially on the metopes of the Roman Doric Order....

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mutule

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture.

Flat inclined block on the soffit of the Doric cornice, with several guttae on the underside, placed in line with the triglyphs and centre-lines of metopes in the frieze below. Tuscan...

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Lapiths

Overview page. Subjects: Archaeology — Religion.

[CP]

A mythical people in Thessaly who, under King Pirithous, fought and conquered the Cebtaurs. This conflict was frequently used to represent the triumph of civilization over...

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Triglyph

in Grove Art Online

August 1996; p ublished online January 1998 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Art. 75 words.

Carved ornamental feature of a Doric frieze in the shape of a block or tablet with three parallel, vertical, V-shaped grooves spaced at regular intervals (the precise configuration consists...

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Lord Elgin

Overview page. Subjects: Archaeology — World History.

(1766–1841) [Bi]

Seventh earl of Elgin, who was a British diplomat, explorer, and amateur antiquarian. He was the British ambassador to Turkey between 1799 and 1803, during which...

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Phaea

Ken Dowden.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Religion in the Ancient World. 181 words.

Phaea, the ferocious Sow of Crommyon, killed by *Theseus, first called Phaea in Apollod. Epit. 1. 1 (1st cent. ce). It is named by (or maybe ‘after’) the old woman who reared it. Crommyon...

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Theseus in art

Karim Arafat.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Religion in the Ancient World. 429 words.

The fight with the Minotaur, the only Theseus story regularly shown in Archaic art, is among the most popular of all scenes, continuing to imperial times in many media. The Minotaur is shown with...

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