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applause

Overview page. Subjects: Music — Theatre.

Spectators' appreciation for performances has often been demonstrated through the clapping of hands. Applause is part of a larger set of social behaviours intimately related to the...

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<i>Bualadh bos</i>

Edited by Sean McMahon and Jo O'Donoghue.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

January 2006; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 48 words.

The Irish term for applause, pronounced ‘boola bus’ and often used in Hiberno-English. ‘Déan bualadh bos anois

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Give it up

Edited by John Ayto and Ian Crofton.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 33 words.

An exhortation to give someone, especially a performer, a large and enthusiastic round of applause (as in ‘Let's give it

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Go down a storm

Edited by John Ayto and Ian Crofton.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 110 words.

To be enthusiastically received by an audience, who react to one's speech or performance with a storm of applause. [Chancellor

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Lap of honour

Edited by John Ayto and Ian Crofton.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable

January 2009; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 33 words.

A celebratory circuit of a racetrack or sports field by a winner or winning team to receive applause. The expression

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Viva!

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 53 words.

An exclamation of applause or joy, from the Italian, meaning ‘(long) live’. A viva voce examination is usually called a

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ovation

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 32 words.

(in ancient Rome) lesser triumph XVI; †exultation XVII; enthusiastic applause XIX. — L. ovātiō, -ōn-, f. ovāre celebrate

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plaudit

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 31 words.

XVII. Shortening of trisyllabic †plaudite (XVI), orig. appeal for applause at the close of a play — L. plauditē

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curtain

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 103 words.

curtain call the appearance of one or more performers on stage after a performance to acknowledge the audience's applause.

curtain

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Claptrap

Edited by Susie Dent.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

January 2012; p ublished online January 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 60 words.

In the 18th century claptrap was something contrived to bring applause, otherwise a trap to make people clap. After a

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claptrap

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 30 words.

nonsense; originally from a theatrical device of the 18th century designed to elicit applause. The term in its current sense

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