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Dion

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(c.408–353).

Son of Hipparinus, Dionysius I's father-in-law. A disciple of Plato from 388/7, married Dionysius' daughter Arete and became his most trusted minister and...

See overview in Oxford Index

Lysias, Attic orator

Stephen Todd.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 939 words.

The ancient biographical tradition, that he was born in 459/8 and died c.380 bce ([Plut.] Vit. Lys. 835c, 836a; Dion. Hal. Lys. 1, 12), is clear but problematic. The latter date is plausible; the...

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Laws of the Kings

Carlos Amunátegui Perelló.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 3704 words.

According to tradition, during its first two and a half centuries of existence, seven kings governed Rome. Each of these promulgated regulations, which were known as the “laws of the kings”...

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logographers

Lionel Pearson and Simon Hornblower.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Greek and Roman Law. 651 words.

The word λογογράφος, as used by the contemporaries of *Demosthenes (2), commonly means a speech-writer for litigants in the courts, or else a writer of prose, as distinct from a poet (cf. Arist. Rh....

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plebs

Arnaldo Momigliano and Andrew Lintott.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Ancient Roman History; Greek and Roman Law. 593 words.

Plebs, the name given to the mass of Roman citizens, as distinct from the privileged patricians, perhaps related to the Greek term for the masses, plethos. A modern hypothesis that the plebs was...

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