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Dion

Overview page. Subjects: Classical Studies.

(c.408–353).

Son of Hipparinus, Dionysius I's father-in-law. A disciple of Plato from 388/7, married Dionysius' daughter Arete and became his most trusted minister and...

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Boucicault, Dion

Martin Meisel.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of British Literature

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 3278 words.

Dion Boucicault (1820–1890) resigned any elevated literary ambitions early in his career, and made plain his embrace of

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Boucicault, Dion (1820–90)

Edited by Dinah Birch and Katy Hooper.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 119 words.

Playwright. He achieved great success with his comedy London Assurance (1841), written under the pseudonym of Lee Morton

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Boucicault, Dion (1820–90)

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 170 words.

born in Dublin and educated at University College School, London. He began his career as an actor and achieved great

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Boucicault, Dion (1820–90)

Edited by Margaret Drabble, Jenny Stringer and Daniel Hahn.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 105 words.

(1820–90),

playwright, achieved great success with his comedy London Assurance (1841), written under the pseudonym

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Boucicault Dion[ysius] Lardner (1820–1890)

Robert Welch.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 289 words.

(1820–1890),

actor and playwright; reared by a Huguenot family in Dublin, but actually an illegitimate son of

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Colleen Bawn, The; <i>or The Bride of Garryowen</i>

Robert Welch.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 49 words.

(1860), a popular melodrama by Dion Boucicault based on Gerald Griffin's novel The Collegians (1829).

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Octoroon, The; <i>or Life in Louisiana</i>

Robert Welch.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 46 words.

(1859), a melodrama by Dion Boucicault, based on Mayne Reid's novel The Quadroon (1856).

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<i>Colleen Bawn, The</i>

Edited by Dinah Birch.

in The Oxford Companion to English Literature

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 23 words.

A play adapted in 1860 by Dion *Boucicault from a novel, The Collegians, by Gerald *Griffin.

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Myles-na-Gopaleen

Robert Welch.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 40 words.

a minor character in Gerald Griffin's novel The Collegians (1829), later becoming a major figure with Dion

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Shaughraun, The

Robert Welch.

in The Concise Oxford Companion to Irish Literature

January 2000; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies (British and Irish). 50 words.

(1875), a political melodrama set on the west coast of Ireland, in which Dion Boucicault's sympathetic version

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