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actual

Overview page. Subjects: Law.

In legal usage in many contexts, the actual (what occurs in fact, and may be proved as a fact) is contrasted with what is deemed or implied by operation of ...

See overview in Oxford Index

<i>Satire</i> 10

James Uden.

in The Invisible Satirist

November 2014; p ublished online October 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: Classical Literature. 13377 words.

The genre of Roman satire owes a debt to the Cynic form of the diatribe. Yet in Juvenal’s period, Cynic elements were not merely a fossilized element of his poetic tradition: the second...

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Passennus Paullus Propertius

Edward Courtney.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Literature. 67 words.

Passennus Paullus Propertius, an eques (see equites) from Assisi (*Asisium), whose contemporary *Pliny (2) (Ep. 6. 15, 9. 22) praises him for his elegies as being, like his actual descent, Propertian...

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R. O. A. M. Lyne

R. O. A. M. Lyne.

Edited by S. J. Harrison.

May 2007; p ublished online September 2007 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature. 440 pages.

This book collects the papers of Oliver Lyne, and was conceived by a group of his former pupils and colleagues as a memorial to Oliver. To make it the more accessible, effective, and...

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The Cup of Song

Edited by Vanessa Cazzato, Dirk Obbink and Enrico Emanuele Prodi.

September 2016; p ublished online November 2016 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature. 352 pages.

The symposion is arguably the most significant and well-documented context for the performance, transmission, and criticism of archaic and classical Greek poetry. The Cup of Song explores...

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Emperors and Usurpers

Andrew G. Scott.

July 2018; p ublished online May 2018 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature. 216 pages.

This historical commentary examines books 79(78)–80(80) of Cassius Dio’s Roman History, which cover the period from the death of Caracalla in 217 B.C. to the reign of Severus Alexander and...

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Drakōn

Daniel Ogden.

February 2013; p ublished online May 2013 .

Book. Subjects: Classical Literature. 496 pages.

Drakōn is the first substantial survey in any language of the Graeco-Roman reflex of the dragon or the supernatural serpent, the drakōn or draco. Yet dragons were all-pervasive...

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closure

Deborah Roberts.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online December 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Literature. 341 words.

Closure, the sense of finality or conclusiveness at the end of a work or some part of it. In addition to the basic fulfilment of expectations raised by particular texts, some ancient genres show...

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stichometry

P. J. Parsons.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Literature. 429 words.

Stichometry, the modern name for an ancient system of numbering lines in literary texts. In Greek papyri, this numbering takes two forms. (1) Marginal: each hundredth line marked with a letter of the...

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Tullius Cicero, Marcus, speeches, the famous orator Cicero

Jonathan G. F. Powell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online July 2015 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Literature. 1384 words.

Fifty-eight speeches of Cicero survive in whole or part; numerous others were unpublished or lost (88 are recorded by Crawford).

Cicero's normal practice, if he decided to publish...

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prose-rhythm, Latin

Jonathan G. F. Powell.

in Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Classics

P ublished online March 2016 .

Article. Subjects: Classical Literature. 1510 words.

In the classical period, the Roman ear was clearly sensitive to patterns of quantity in formal spoken prose. An effective rhythm could provoke spontaneous applause (Cic. Or. 214). Doubtless...

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