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cock-fighting

Overview page. Subjects: Regional and National History.

A ferocious blood‐sport, probably introduced by the Romans, in which intensively trained gamecocks with metal or bone spurs were set to fight, usually to the death, on a stage in a circular...

See overview in Oxford Index

cock‐fighting

John Cannon and Robert Crowcroft.

in A Dictionary of British History

P ublished online July 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 91 words.

A ferocious blood‐sport, probably introduced by the Romans, in which intensively trained gamecocks with metal or bone spurs were set

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cock-fighting

Jacqueline Simpson and Steve Roud.

in A Dictionary of English Folklore

January 2003; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 269 words.

Particularly popular at Shrovetide, but found at any time of year, either on an ad hoc basis or in

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cock-fighting

Alan Tomlinson.

in A Dictionary of Sports Studies

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Sports and Outdoor Recreation. 280 words.

A form of animal-baiting or blood sport practised in ancient cultures and widely popular from the 14th century in Britain,

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cock fighting

Neal Garnham.

in The Oxford Companion to Irish History

January 2002; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Regional and National History. 147 words.

was probably introduced to Ireland by British settlers, though domestic origins are also possible. Whatever the practice's precise roots, by

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cock fighting

David Hey.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

January 1997; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Local and Family History. 39 words.

was originally an outdoor ‘sport’ held in circular pits dug into the ground. Throwing stones at cocks was a traditional

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Isolation of <i>Microsporum gallinae</i> from a fighting cock (<i>Gallus gallus domesticus</i>) in Japan

Michiko Murata, Hideo Takahashi, Sana Takahashi, Yoko Takahashi, Hiroji Chibana, Yoshiteru Murata, Kazutoshi Sugiyama, Takashi Kaneshima, Sayaka Yamaguchi, Hitona Miyasato, Masaru Murakami, Rui Kano, Atsuhiko Hasegawa, Hiroshi Uezato, Atsushi Hosokawa and Ayako Sano.

in Medical Mycology

February 2013; p ublished online February 2013 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Mycology and Fungi; Infectious Diseases; Medical Toxicology; Veterinary Medicine; Environmental Science. 2468 words.

A case of tinea corporis caused by Microsporum gallinae was found in 2011 in Okinawa, located in the southern part of Japan. The patient was a 96-year-old, otherwise healthy, Japanese man,...

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cock-fighting

Overview page. Subjects: Regional and National History.

A ferocious blood‐sport, probably introduced by the Romans, in which intensively trained gamecocks with metal or bone spurs were set to fight, usually to the death, on a stage in a circular...

See overview in Oxford Index

Cutler's Cock Fight

Harry W. Pfanz.

in Gettysburg—The First Day

July 2001; p ublished online July 2014 .

Chapter. Subjects: History of the Americas. 3768 words.

This chapter describes the Union infantry's debut into the conflict at Gettysburg, which was marked by fire exchanged between the brigades of Brig. Gen. Lysander Cutler and Brig. Gen....

Go to University of North Carolina Press »  abstract

cock‐fighting

John Cannon.

in A Dictionary of British History

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 91 words.

A ferocious blood‐sport, probably introduced by the Romans, in which intensively trained gamecocks with metal or bone spurs were set

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cock-fighting

A. S. Hargreaves.

in The Oxford Companion to British History

P ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: British History. 186 words.

A ferocious blood-sport, probably introduced by the Romans, in which intensively trained gamecocks with metal or bone spurs slipped over

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