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Fable

Alexander Kazhdan.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

January 1991; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 296 words.

(μυ̑θος) was considered by rhetoricians as a type of progymnasma; it had, however, a broader function of communicating a

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beast fable

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

The commonest type of fable, in which animals and birds speak and behave like human beings in a short tale usually illustrating some moral point. The fables attributed to Aesop (6th century...

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Fable, <i>Fabliau</i>

Pierre-Yves Badel.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 481 words.

The hypothesis that the fable gave birth to the fabliau is not very convincing. The fabliau is fable only if

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beast fable and epic

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 1512 words.

The medieval tradition of the beast fable has its roots in classical antiquity, and since the time of Herodotus at

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Epilogue <i>Babette's Feast</i>: A Fable for Culinary France

in Accounting for Taste

July 2004; p ublished online May 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945). 7146 words.

This epilogue focuses on Babette's Feast (1987), a quasi-cult food film by the Danish director Gabriel Axel that may be considered a modern fable of French culinary culture. An exemplary...

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History, Myth, and Fiction

Peter Burke.

in The Oxford History of Historical Writing

March 2012; p ublished online March 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700). 9350 words.

This chapter explores the tangled relations of history, myth, and fiction. It considers the problems of bias and authenticity, and the so-called ‘rehabilitation of myth’. It argues that at...

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Sincerity, Prophecy, Responsibility

Ciaran Brady.

in James Anthony Froude

March 2013; p ublished online May 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945). 7969 words.

Opening with an account of two apparently contradictory fables—one a dream of judgement day, the other a dystopian vision of the future set in Cape Town in 1950—this concluding chapter...

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Politics, Poetry and Literature

in Political Communication and Political Culture in England, 1558-1688

November 2012; p ublished online June 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Early Modern History (1500 to 1700). 12088 words.

This chapter tries to illustrate the idea that literature, and especially poetry, were part of the political discourse of the period. It describes how various modes of poetic expression...

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The Road to Recovery: From Philosophy to History, 1849–56

Ciaran Brady.

in James Anthony Froude

March 2013; p ublished online May 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945). 16200 words.

This chapter traces the slow and far from certain emergence of Froude as an historian. The very audacity of his fictional techniques combine with the deeply disturbing nature of their moral...

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Rumors of Disorder

Max Harris.

in Sacred Folly

February 2011; p ublished online August 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 5295 words.

This chapter examines unwarranted rumors of disorder in the Feast of Fools despite the evidence of sustained support by cathedral chapters. One such rumor arises from a reference to the...

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