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Fable, <i>Fabliau</i>

Pierre-Yves Badel.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 481 words.

The hypothesis that the fable gave birth to the fabliau is not very convincing. The fabliau is fable only if

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beast fable

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

The commonest type of fable, in which animals and birds speak and behave like human beings in a short tale usually illustrating some moral point. The fables attributed to Aesop (6th century...

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beast fable and epic

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 1512 words.

The medieval tradition of the beast fable has its roots in classical antiquity, and since the time of Herodotus at

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Fable

Alexander Kazhdan.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

January 1991; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 296 words.

(μυ̑θος) was considered by rhetoricians as a type of progymnasma; it had, however, a broader function of communicating a

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Epilogue <i>Babette's Feast</i>: A Fable for Culinary France

in Accounting for Taste

July 2004; p ublished online May 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945). 7146 words.

This epilogue focuses on Babette's Feast (1987), a quasi-cult food film by the Danish director Gabriel Axel that may be considered a modern fable of French culinary culture. An exemplary...

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Animal Epics

Elizabeth M. Jeffreys.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

January 1991; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 284 words.

narratives akin to the fable, though normally on a larger scale and lacking an explicit moral. Such material, which

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Boner (Bonerius), Ulrich (<i>c</i>.1324–<i>c</i>.1349)

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 61 words.

Swiss *Dominican who wrote Der Edelstein, a popular collection of 100 moralizing fables on religious and political themes. Based

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Henryson, Robert (1475)

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 80 words.

He is best known for his masterful retelling of Aesop’s fables (Morall Fabillis of Esope), his Christian continuation

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Berakhia ben Natronai Ha-Naqdan (1190)

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 80 words.

His Mishlei Shualim (Fox Fables), relying on the Romulus Latin translation of Aesop, may also have been taken from the

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Stricker, Der (<i>c</i>.1190–1250)

in The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 62 words.

whose name probably means ‘weaver’ or ‘knitter’; best known for approximately 170 short verse narratives and fables, although he also

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