Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-4 of 4 items for:

field-names x Constitutional and Administrative Law x clear all

Refine by type

Refine by product

 

field-names

Overview page. Subjects: History.

Collecting all the field‐names of a parish from every available source, from earliest times to the present day, is a worthwhile task for a local historian or a group project. Unlike the...

See overview in Oxford Index

The Discretionary Heart of Administrative Law

Lord Cooke of Thorndon.

in The Golden Metwand and the Crooked Cord

February 1998; p ublished online March 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law. 8912 words.

This chapter argues that administrative law is so much occupied with defining the boundaries of discretion when the substance of decisions is under review that it would not be inappropriate...

Go to Oxford Scholarship Online »  abstract

Stable Core Meaning of ‘Remedy’

Rafal Zakrzewski.

in Remedies Reclassified

April 2005; p ublished online March 2012 .

Chapter. Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law. 10200 words.

This chapter identifies and explains the stable core concept of a remedy. As Dobbs states, the field of remedies needs suitable boundaries. This chapter demarcates these boundaries by...

Go to Oxford Scholarship Online »  abstract

Does Intellectual Property Have Personality?

David Vaver.

in Rights of Personality in Scots Law

November 2009; p ublished online May 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law. 13905 words.

Focusing on English law (which strongly influences the Scots law),Chapter 8 illuminates the extent to which intellectual property laws – mainly copyright (including neighbouring and moral...

Go to Edinburgh University Press »  abstract

Linguistic Knowledge and Legal Interpretation

Lawrence M. Solan.

in The Nature of Legal Interpretation

May 2017; p ublished online January 2018 .

Chapter. Subjects: Constitutional and Administrative Law. 8177 words.

The biggest problems for legal interpretation lie not in the syntax and semantics that linguists work so hard to describe. Rather, the bulk of the problems lie in the fact that our use of...

Go to University of Chicago Press »  abstract