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Graces

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The Graces, or Charites, not to be confused with the Graeae, were offspring of the Greek god Zeus and a sea nymph, Eurynome. They were three in number—Aglaia, Euprosyne, and Thalia,...

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graces

Overview page.

Be in someone's good (or bad) graces be regarded by someone with favour (or disfavour).

See also the Three Graces at three.

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graces

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 23 words.

be in someone's good (or bad) graces be regarded by someone with favour (or disfavour).

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Graces

David Leeming.

in The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 39 words.

The Graces, or Charites, not to be confused with the Graeae, were offspring of the Greek god Zeus and

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Graces

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The Graces, or Charites, not to be confused with the Graeae, were offspring of the Greek god Zeus and a sea nymph, Eurynome. They were three in number—Aglaia, Euprosyne, and Thalia,...

See overview in Oxford Index

Expectative Graces

Anne-Marie Hayez.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 145 words.

Expectatives were pontifical graces issued to petitioning clerics and enjoining the ordinary collators to deliver to them the first Benefice

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Graces, the

Edited by Sean McMahon and Jo O'Donoghue.

in Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

January 2006; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 142 words.

Fifty-one ‘Instructions and Graces’ originally offered by Charles I in 1626 to the Old English in exchange for subsidies to

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Expectative Graces

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500).

Expectatives were pontifical graces issued to petitioning clerics and enjoining the ordinary collators to deliver to them the first Benefice of a certain nature and a certain value that...

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Mediatrix of All Graces

Edited by E. A. Livingstone.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

January 2013; p ublished online January 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Christianity. 30 words.

a title ascribed to the BVM, reflecting the belief that she intercedes with her Son to give graces to human

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airs and graces <i>n.</i>

Jonathon Green.

in Green's Dictionary of Slang

January 2010; p ublished online January 2011 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 213 words.

1 faces.

1960 J. Franklyn Dict. of Rhy. Sl. 31/1: airs and graces […] (last quarter 19C.) it meant (3)

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airs and graces

Overview page.

An affectation of superiority, recorded from the mid 19th century, as in Thackeray's Vanity Fair (1848), ‘Old Sir Pitt…chuckled at her airs and graces, and would laugh…at her assumptions of...

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