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Illusion

Overview page. Subjects: Music.

Formed in 1964 in Long Island, New York, USA, the Illusion were a locally popular band in the same ‘blue-eyed soul’ scene that also produced more world-famous bands such as ...

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illusions

Richard L. Gregory.

in The Oxford Companion to the Mind

January 2004; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 8247 words.

1. What are illusions? 2. Phenomenal phenomena 3. Illusions and behaviour 4. Illusions in science and art 5. Explaining illusions

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Illusion

William Fish.

in Perception, Hallucination, and Illusion

October 2009; p ublished online May 2009 .

Chapter. Subjects: Philosophy of Mind. 16647 words.

This chapter concludes the book by offering accounts of the different illusions to which we can be subject. Some illusions—illusions of color, shape, and scenes viewed through lenses—are...

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illusion

Bryan A. Garner.

in Garner’s Modern English Usage

January 2016; p ublished online August 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 117 words.

These words are used differently despite their similar meanings. An illusion exists in one's fancy or imagination. A delusion is

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illusion

Edited by John Ayto.

in Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 71 words.

be under the illusion that wrongly believe that. 1998 Independent The keening harmonies of the Brothers Gibb, a million naff

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illusionism

Michael Clarke and Deborah Clarke.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theory of Art. 75 words.

The use of pictorial devices such as *foreshortening and *perspective to heighten the illusion of reality in a

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illusions

in The Oxford Companion to Architecture

January 2009; p ublished online January 2009 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 535 words.

Perhaps the first type of illusion is a borderline case, the *refinements introduced into the Parthenon, to counteract the

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illusions

Stuart Anstis.

in The Oxford Companion to Consciousness

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Psychology. 2475 words.

Illusions confuse and bias the machinery in the brain that constructs our representations of the world, because they reveal a

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illusions

Colin Blakemore and Sheila Jennett.

in The Oxford Companion to the Body

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Biological Sciences. 1129 words.

We see far more than meets the eyes, though not always correctly, for we experience various phenomena of illusion —

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Illusionism

Julian Bell.

in The Oxford Companion to Western Art

January 2001; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of Art. 844 words.

the attempt in the visual arts to give the illusion that what is represented is substantially present. The use of

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illusion

Bryan A. Garner.

in The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

January 2000; p ublished online January 2002 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 54 words.

These words are used differently despite their similar meanings. An illusion exists in one's fancy or imagination. A delusion is

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