Oxford Index Search Results

You are looking at 1-10 of 19 items for:

plasma x Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology x clear all

plasma

Overview page. Subjects: Physics.

A low-density, high-temperature, completely ionized gas, consisting of free atomic nuclei and free electrons. Overall it is electrically neutral. It is sometimes referred to as the ‘fourth...

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The effect of different degrees of feed restriction on heat shock protein 70, acute phase proteins, and other blood parameters in female broiler breeders

P. Najafi, I. Zulkifli, A. F. Soleimani and P. Kashiani.

in Poultry Science

October 2015; p ublished online August 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 5408 words.

The aim of the current study was to determine the physiological response to feed restriction in female broiler breeders using a range of conventional and novel indicators. One hundred...

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Biology of stress in poultry with emphasis on glucocorticoids and the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio

Colin G. Scanes.

in Poultry Science

September 2016; p ublished online June 2016 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 5443 words.

The biology of stress in chickens is reviewed. Not only is stress associated with depressed production, but animal welfare influences consumer acceptance of poultry and eggs. The reciprocal...

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Welfare indicators in laying hens in relation to nest exclusion

M. Alm, R. Tauson, L. Holm, A. Wichman, O. Kalliokoski and H. Wall.

in Poultry Science

June 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 7976 words.

Consumer concerns about the welfare of laying hens are increasing, leading to increased interest in identifying reliable ways to assess welfare. The present study evaluated invasive and...

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Effects of color temperatures (Kelvin) of LED bulbs on blood physiological variables of broilers grown to heavy weights

H. A. Olanrewaju, J. L. Purswell, S. D. Collier and S. L. Branton.

in Poultry Science

August 2015; p ublished online June 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 5534 words.

Light-emitting diode (LED) lighting is being used in the poultry industry to reduce energy usage in broiler production facilities. However, limited data are available comparing efficacy of...

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Comparison of Two LED Light Bulbs to a Dimmable CFL and their Effects on Broiler Chicken Growth, Stress, and Fear

Jesse C. Huth and Gregory S. Archer.

in Poultry Science

September 2015; p ublished online August 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 7697 words.

The poultry industry is currently undergoing a shift to alternative lighting sources as incandescent lights become less available. While LED and CFL bulbs both have associated increased...

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Ecological context determines the choice between prey of different salinities

Jorge S. Gutiérrez and Theunis Piersma.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2016; p ublished online November 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Evolutionary Biology; Zoology and Animal Sciences; Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 7055 words.

Food choice has profound implications for the relative intakes of water and salts, and thus for an animal’s physiological state. Discrimination behaviors with respect salt intake have been...

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Extreme ecology and mating system: discriminating among direct benefits models in red flour beetles

Elizabeth M. Droge-Young, John M. Belote, Anjalika Eeswara and Scott Pitnick.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2016; p ublished online November 2015 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Evolutionary Biology; Zoology and Animal Sciences; Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 8420 words.

We address the adaptive significance of female remating in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, a model system with an extreme mating system of little-to-no premating discrimination...

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Social conflict and costs of cooperation in meerkats are reflected in measures of stress hormones

Ben Dantzer, Nigel C. Bennett and Tim H. Clutton-Brock.

in Behavioral Ecology

August 2017; p ublished online June 2017 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Evolutionary Biology; Zoology and Animal Sciences; Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 9250 words.

Abstract

Measures of glucocorticoid stress hormones (e.g. cortisol) have often been used to characterize conflict between subordinates and dominants. In...

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Evaluation of sex differences in the stopover behavior and postdeparture movements of wood-warblers

Yolanda E Morbey, Christopher G Guglielmo, Philip D Taylor, Ivan Maggini, Jessica Deakin, Stuart A Mackenzie, J Morgan Brown and Lin Zhao.

Edited by David Stephens.

in Behavioral Ecology

January 2018; p ublished online December 2017 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Ecology and Conservation; Evolutionary Biology; Zoology and Animal Sciences; Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology. 8759 words.

Abstract

Sex differences in the behaviors underlying avian protandry, where males arrive at breeding areas earlier than females, are still poorly understood...

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Reproductive Seasonality in <i>Aethomys namaquensis</i> (Rodentia: Muridae) from Southern Africa

Sachariah P. Muteka, Christian T. Chimimba and Nigel C. Bennett.

in Journal of Mammalogy

February 2006; p ublished online February 2006 .

Journal Article. Subjects: Zoology and Animal Sciences; Animal Behaviour and Behavioural Ecology; Animal Ecology; Animal Physiology; Mammalogy. 6301 words.

Very little is known about the reproductive biology of the Namaqua rock mouse (Aethomys namaquensis), despite its wide distribution and its being a major component of small mammal...

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