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Afanc

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[W, beavers].

A kind of water-monster in the whirlpool of Llyn yr Afanc on the River Conway in north Wales. Early reports of the monster are not specific about its shape, but it...

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Afanc

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[W, beavers].

A kind of water-monster in the whirlpool of Llyn yr Afanc on the River Conway in north Wales. Early reports of the monster are not specific about its shape, but it...

See overview in Oxford Index

Afanc

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 155 words.

[W, beavers].

A kind of water-monster in the whirlpool of Llyn yr Afanc on the River Conway in north Wales.

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Addanc

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 5 words.

Variant spelling of Afanc.

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Abac

James MacKillop.

in A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

January 2004; p ublished online January 2004 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Customs and Traditions. 5 words.

Irish for Afanc.

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ceffyl dwfr

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[W, water horse].

A malevolent horse-like creature inhabiting streams and lakes in Welsh folklore; a counterpart of the Ir. and ScG each uisce/uisge, the Scottish kelpie, and the...

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Llyn Llion

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Fabulous ‘Lake of the Waves’ in early Welsh tradition, the overflowing of which caused the flood from which Dwyfan and Dwyfach escaped only in a ship built by Nefyd Naf Neifion. Also the...

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cìrein cròin

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

[ScG, grey crest].

A sea monster in Scottish Gaelic folklore, thought to be the largest of all living creatures, capable of making a meal of seven whales. Known in songs and...

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Dwyfan and Dwyfach

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

Welsh equivalents of Noah or Deucalion who take their names from small rivers, as told in a flood legend from the Triads. A great flood was caused by the monster Afanc, who dwelt in Llyn...

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each uisce

Overview page. Subjects: Religion.

The malevolent water-horse of Irish [each uisce] and Scottish Gaelic [each uisge] folklore whose name has endured several anglicizations, e.g. aughisky; comparable to the cabyll-ushtey and...

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