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antic

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture — Art.

A term used to denote the fantastic, bizarre, or distorted nature of a particular piece of sculpture or decoration.

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antic

Overview page. Subjects: Architecture — Art.

A term used to denote the fantastic, bizarre, or distorted nature of a particular piece of sculpture or decoration.

See overview in Oxford Index

Antic

Overview page. Subjects: Literature.

Started in June 1986, partly in response to the imminent demise of AND, as a journal of artwork and debate about the arts and criticism, especially from the viewpoint of ...

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antic

James Stevens Curl.

in A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture

January 2006; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 54 words.

1 Grotesque ornamental representation of human, animal, and floral forms bizarrely mingled.

2 Deliberately monstrous, fantastic, and caricatured ornamental representations

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antic

in New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary

January 2012; p ublished online May 2013 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 390 words.

achromatic, acrobatic, Adriatic, aerobatic, anagrammatic, aquatic, aristocratic, aromatic, Asiatic, asthmatic, athematic, attic, autocratic, automatic, axiomatic, bureaucratic,...

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antic

in Oxford Dictionary of Rhymes

January 2007; p ublished online January 2007 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Language Reference. 389 words.

achromatic, acrobatic, Adriatic, aerobatic, anagrammatic, aquatic, aristocratic, aromatic, Asiatic, asthmatic, athematic, attic, autocratic, automatic, axiomatic, bureaucratic,...

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antic

Michael Clarke and Deborah Clarke.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms

January 2010; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Theory of Art. 20 words.

A term used to denote the fantastic, bizarre, or distorted nature of a particular piece of sculpture or decoration.

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antic

Edited by T. F. Hoad.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

January 1996; p ublished online January 2003 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 24 words.

(arch.) grotesque, fantastic; sb. †fantastic or grotesque figure, clown; ludicrous gesture or posture XVI. — It. antico ANTIQUE, used

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Antic

Roger Robinson.

in The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature

January 1998; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Literary Studies - World. 106 words.

started in June 1986, partly in response to the imminent demise of AND, as a journal of artwork

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antic

James Stevens Curl and Susan Wilson.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Architecture

January 2015; p ublished online May 2015 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Architecture. 51 words.

1. *Grotesque ornamental representation of human, animal, and floral forms bizarrely mingled.

2. Deliberately monstrous, fantastic, and caricatured representations

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Antic Hay

Overview page. Subjects: Literary Studies (20th Century onwards).

A novel by A. Huxley, published in 1923. Regarded at the time as an ‘immoral’ book as much for its intellectual irreverence as for its open depiction of sexual affairs ...

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