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Bakufu

Overview page.

The term bakufu, literally “field government,” refers to the governmental organization of the Japanese shoguns. Although the term is commonly used by historians, it is relatively rare in...

See overview in Oxford Index

Bakufu

Mark Ravina.

in Oxford Encyclopedia of the Modern World

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Contemporary History (Post 1945). 891 words.

The term bakufu, literally “field government,” refers to the governmental organization of the Japanese shoguns. Although the term is

Go to Oxford Reference »  home page

Bakufu

Overview page.

The term bakufu, literally “field government,” refers to the governmental organization of the Japanese shoguns. Although the term is commonly used by historians, it is relatively rare in...

See overview in Oxford Index

The Zheng Regime and the Tokugawa <i>Bakufu</i>

Patrizia Carioti.

in Sea Rovers, Silver, and Samurai

February 2016; p ublished online November 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Asian History. 11122 words.

This chapter examines how the Zheng maritime organization used its commercial influence over Japan as a political instrument to pressure the Tokugawa bakufu (shogunate) to intervene in the...

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Jeffrey P. Mass. <i>Yoritomo and the Founding of the First Bakufu: The Origins of Dual Government in Japan</i>. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 1999. Pp. xiii, 278. $49.50

Janet R. Goodwin.

in The American Historical Review

April 2002; p ublished online April 2002 .

Journal Article. Subjects: World History. 0 words.

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Tokyo

Tetsuji Okazaki.

in The Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History

January 2003; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Economic History. 559 words.

Development of the Tokyo area began in the early seventeenth century, when Ieyasu Tokugawa (1543–1616) settled the government (Bakufu

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Shugakuin Rikyū (Shugakuin Detached Palace)

Overview page. Subjects: Lifestyle, Home, and Garden.

Kyoto, Japan, was built as a country villa by Emperor Gomizunoo (1596–1680). In 1629, reacting to edicts from the Tokugawa bakufu (military government) restricting aristocratic rights, the...

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Where Are the Authentic Monks?

Jiang Wu.

in Leaving for the Rising Sun

December 2014; p ublished online January 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 13253 words.

This chapter describes a series of the bakufu’s attempts to reform Manpukuji and to recruit more Chinese monks to Japan. During the late seventeenth century, measures had been taken by...

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The Taikun’s Zen Master from China

Jiang Wu.

in Leaving for the Rising Sun

December 2014; p ublished online January 2015 .

Chapter. Subjects: Buddhism. 10953 words.

This chapter offers a new interpretation of Yinyuan’s success in Japan by situating his arrival into the bakufu’s agenda of establishing a Japan-centered world order. The first part of the...

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Seventeenth-Century Tokugawa Exceptionalism

Mark Thomas McNally.

in Like No Other

December 2015; p ublished online November 2016 .

Chapter. Subjects: Asian History. 13728 words.

While the flawed association of Kokugaku with nativism leads scholars to the concept of exceptionalism, the historiographical analysis of Tokugawa exceptionalism should neither begin nor...

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Engaging the Center

in The Vaccinators

May 2007; p ublished online June 2013 .

Chapter. Subjects: Asian History. 8217 words.

This chapter analyzes the ways in which Japan's vaccinators finally engaged the Tokugawa bakufu in their efforts to promote Jennerian vaccination in the city of Edo. Following the outbreak...

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