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cardinal

Overview page. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500) — Christianity.

A high church official, appointed by the pope. The cardinals (from Latin cardo, ‘hinge’) were defined as a ‘sacred college’ with clearly defined functions in the 11th century, when they ...

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cardinal

Agostino Paravicini Bagliani.

in Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

January 2002; p ublished online January 2005 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Medieval and Renaissance History (500 to 1500). 1339 words.

Three groups of cardinals existed at Rome. First the cardinal-bishops (episcopi cardinales), present at Roman synods before

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cardinal

Edited by Elizabeth Knowles.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

January 2005; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 78 words.

of fundamental importance (formed as cardinal).

cardinal humour each of the four chief humours of the body.

cardinal

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cardinality

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2008; p ublished online January 2008 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 17 words.

The cardinality of a set is the *cardinal number that measures the number of its members.

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cardinality

Simon Blackburn.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy

January 2016; p ublished online March 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Philosophy. 17 words.

The cardinality of a set is the *cardinal number that measures the number of its members.

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Cardinal

Edited by Patrick Hanks.

in Dictionary of American Family Names

January 2003; p ublished online January 2006 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Names Studies. 115 words.

English, French, Spanish, and Dutch: from Middle English, Old French cardinal ‘cardinal’, the church dignitary (Latin cardinalis, originally an

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cardinal

Julia Cresswell.

in The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins

January 2009; p ublished online January 2010 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: History of English. 49 words.

[OE]

The connection between a cardinal, ‘a senior Roman Catholic priest’, and cardinal, ‘fundamental, most important’, is a door hinge.

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cardinality

James Nicholson.

in The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Mathematics

January 2014; p ublished online September 2014 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Pure Mathematics. 80 words.

For a finite set A, the cardinality of A, denoted by n(A), is the number

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cardinal

Overview page.

Of fundamental importance (formed as cardinal1).

cardinal humour each of the four chief humours of the body.

cardinal number a number denoting quantity (one, two, three,...

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Cardinals

Stella Fletcher.

in Renaissance and Reformation

P ublished online June 2012 .

Article. Subjects: Modern History (1700 to 1945); Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy. 12154 words.

Deriving from the Latin cardo (hinge), cardinals were originally priests permanently attached to particular churches. Roman cardinals were beneficiaries of the 11th- and 12th-century...

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cardinality

Edited by Andrew Butterfield and Gerard Ekembe Ngondi.

in A Dictionary of Computer Science

January 2016; p ublished online January 2016 .

Reference Entry. Subjects: Computing. 189 words.

A measure of the size of a *set. Two sets S and T have the same cardinality if

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